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22. - 23. October 2019
Novotel Messe Munich

Wireless Congress: Systems & Applications

Program Wireless Congress 2019

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Complete Program

Day 1 - Tuesday, 22. October 2019

Parallel Sessions

09:00 - 10:30
Opening Session Keynote
09:00 - 09:15
Welcome Prof. Dr. Axel Sikora, Offenburg University / Hahn-Schickard
09:15 - 10:00
Opportunities and Research Challenges of 5G Networks Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Kellerer, Technical University of Munich  
The start of 5G opens up fundamentally new opportunities for wireless networks and is seen as the enabler for machine-type communication, in particular. 5G features including ultra-low latency, high reliability, massive number of devices and very high data rates pose challenges to the underlying network infrastructure. Core and access network technologies are considered to dynamically adapt to specific application demands in order to meet those challenges. At Technical University of Munich, we address these challenges with the “5G Research Hub Munich” (https://www.5g-munich.de/) by realizing a modular application-oriented experimental 5G platform. We start with teleoperation services as an initial use case.
10:00 - 10:30
Coffee and Networking Break

Parallel Sessions

10:30 - 13:30
Topic 1 Technology
10:30 - 11:00
Cognitive Radio Method for Adaptive Media Access in IO-Link Wireless Based Real-Time Wireless Systems Andreas Hennig, Fraunhofer IMS  
Connectivity of all components in industrial manufacturing is a prerequisite for the implementation of Industry 4.0 concepts. The use of wireless technology for communication between the components enables increased mobility and flexibility in production. A significant challenge is the acceptance of wireless technologies by industrial users. In addition to technical aspects such as high reliability, simple installation and handling (plug-and-play) are also important. For example, control loops in industrial plants often have high requirements on the latency (typical cycle times between 1 ms - 12 ms) and reliability (error probability 10-9). At the same time, however, wireless systems must share the common resource "wireless channel". Wireless networking techniques using the 2.4 GHz band are interesting, because this ISM band is available worldwide license-free with only minor restrictions and low-cost components are available. The recently published standard "IO-Link wireless System Extensions", is based on IEEE 802.15.1 like Bluetooth and WISA. It operates in the 2.4 GHz band and meets the requirements of real-time capability. Availability and robustness requirements must be met in coexistence with other wireless systems operating in this ISM band. There is therefore an urgent need for a component to improve the coexistence properties of real-time wireless systems. In particular, as an increasing number of wireless systems will be used in industrial production in the future. Cognitive methods for adaptive media access and coexistence optimization are described extensively in the literature. However, requirements of industrial applications such as minimal latency, strict determinism and low hardware costs are not often considered. In this work an automatic coexistence management is aimed, which fulfils the real-time requirements of corresponding wireless systems and guarantees the highest possible support during the installation and operation for the user of such systems. The concept presented here is based on cognitive methods that are used in telecommunications, for example, to access so-called "white spaces". By means of a cognitive component, the base station (IOLink wireless W-Master) is enabled to recognize which areas of the 2.4 GHz band are available ("Spectrum Sensing"), to select the most suitable frequency range ("Spectrum Management"), to seamlessly change the frequency range ("Spectrum Mobility") and to coordinate the available frequency ranges with other base stations (W-Masters) ("Spectrum Sharing"). The approach presented here enables adaptive media access using "cognitive radio" methods with the lowest possible hardware requirements. Instead of costly "Software Defined Radio" systems, low-cost IoT hardware components are used. The lack of powerful hardware components is compensated by dedicated algorithms. Furthermore, a proposal for an extension of the IOLink protocol is presented.
11:00 - 11:30
Networking of Medical Devices in Emergency Helicopters Helmut Lagger, GPP Communication; Peter Gersing, GPP Communication  
For a better safety of patients in rescue helicopters there is an increasing communication demand of medical devices. The project SafeAerial, funded by the Bavarian ministry of economics, shows how fundamental safety issues can be resolved using wireless communication. Air rescue teams like ADAC fly about 50.000 rescue missions per year. I most cases patients are monitored with medical devices which use acoustical and optical alarms to indicate critical conditions of the patient or of a device dysfunction. Two difficult issues need to be addressed. 1) Because of the enormous ambient noise in rescue helicopters alarm tones can be hardly perceived by the rescue team especially when wearing helmets. 2) Due to the limited space medical devices cannot be placed in plain view of the medical crew. SafeAerial is resolving these issues introducing a wireless networking concept. Following the ideas of IoT medical devices communicate alarms via wireless digital interfaces to an alarm hub. This hub is connected to the intercom of the helicopter and it provides the alarms to the headsets in the helmets of the medical crew. The connection with the devices needs to be wireless since cables are not practical in this environment. The application of wireless solutions within the helicopter cabin is a challenge. Medical devices use standards which are not always suited for this purpose and proprietary alarm protocols which need to be interpreted in the alarm hub. Implementation of a set of protocols for selected devices will be provided in SafeAerial, for further devices an API will allow integration. In the alarm hub the protocols need to be restored to the original sound to be transmitted to the headsets of the medical team. The medical crew is familiar with these original alarm tones and will recognize them. The real challenge is a stable and robust wireless networking. It should operate on a low energy level to avoid interference with other helicopter equipment. At the same time it needs to be reliable. The medical crew should be able to rely on the communication without additional alarming caused by technical communication problems. The data rates to be transmitted are in a low range of several 100 Kbits. However low latency is one of the main requirements. Using currently available wireless standards (e.g. BT, WLAN) does not fulfill these requirements. Current cellular technologies do not support all the needs either. A device to device communication mode without network is a prerequisite for the rescue helicopter scenario. When network coverage is available a feature with the option to connect to hospitals while patients are on the way would be highly appreciated though. The upcoming 5 G standard covers the challenging requirements of such rescue scenarios very well. The respective communication behavior is foreseen with the ultra-reliable low-latency access mode (URLLC). With automatic neighborhood detection medical devices can connect with the alarm hub easily.
11:30 - 12:00
WiFi-Based URLLC: Mission Critical Wireless Communication Today Dr. Mathias Bohge, R3 - Reliable Realtime Radio Communications GmbH  
The 5G Ultra-Reliabe Low-Latency Communications (URLLC) mode will enable multiple wireless control use cases including wireless safety applications. It is, however, not yet clear when it will be available and who will be in charge of providing the URLLC capable networks. Alternatively, mission critical real-time wireless communication is realised based on local-area networks. EchoRing is such a WLAN-based system that can be used already today to unwire mission critical communications in industrial automation. This talk briefly introduces the EchoRing technology and provides an overview over WiFi-based URLLC use cases.
12:00 - 12:30
Chip Based Solutions for Wireless Sensors in the IoT Market Michael Muenkel, STMicroelectronics Application  
The market of IoT and IIoT (Industrial IoT) is essential for STMicroelectronics and the Product development of new semiconductors for: Processing, Connectivity, Sensor Concepts, Power Management and Protection. Target and fast growing markets are Smart Home and Buildings, the Industrial Market (Industry4.0) as well as Smart Infrastructures and Cities. During the wireless congress presentation of ST, we focus on the following examples: Condition Monitoring / Predictive Maintenance, Asset Tracking / Logistics, Smart Home Connectivity and Metering. For those applications there is a huge demand on products for Microcontroller and Processors, R/F chips up to SoC, Smart sensors and energy efficient power management. New and low cost communication principles such as Bluetooth Low Energy on 2.4GHz allow to develop new innovative devices with smart and easy access to Smart Phones and Tablets. Also low power and low cost MESH based Networks can be now realized on top of the BLE standard. Many applications can also be seen in the Sub-1GHz frequency range in heating systems, Heat cost allocators, Metering, Security and Alarm (e.g. connected smoke detectors). New emerging Long Range Technologies (LPWAN) such as Sigfox, LORA or NB-IOT allow the user to send sensor data over large distances. The Asset Tracking and Logistics Market is growing fast as well as Remote Management and Monitoring of machines in various Smart Infrastructures. Various Sensors such as Inertial MEMS, Environmental Sensors and optical Sensors (e.g. Time of Flight) with R/F connectivity are now widely adopted in the Industry. Further developments in AI (Artificial Intelligence) down to device and chip level and new MEMS which are supporting Machine Learning Algorithm are providing even more features and tools to develop smarter applications. In order to support a complete wireless sensor application also new and efficient power management products are essential. New Linear Regulators, DC/DC converter, Battery management chips, wireless charging and energy harvesting components as well as protection circuits for harsh environment complement the semiconductor offering to offer designers to create innovative products for the Future.
12:30 - 13:30
Lunch and Networking Break
10:30 - 13:30
Topic 2 Mobile Communication
10:30 - 11:00
The Role of 5G in Industry 4.0 Ludger Boeggering, u-blox  
The goal of Industry 4.0 is to significantly improve the flexibility and efficiency of production systems. Generally, Industry 4.0 delivers seamless vertical and horizontal integration across the entire value chain and all layers of the automation process. Connectivity is a key to implement Industrie 4.0. Wireless communication, and in particular 5G, is an important way of providing powerful and pervasive communication between machines, people and objects. One of the main differences between 5G and previous generations of cellular networks lies in 5G’s strong focus on machine-type communication and the Internet of Things (IoT). 5G networks will achieve manufacturing flexibility on the factory floor, support a wide variety of sensors, devices, machines, robots, actuators, and terminals. The capabilities of 5G thus extend in communication with unprecedented reliability and very low latencies, and also massive IoT connectivity. 5G’s basic potential is in connected industries, in particular the manufacturing and process industries. In this presentation, I will provide an overview of 5G’s basic potential for manufacturing industry, and describes the most relevant use cases and the corresponding 5G functions and service requirements. Furthermore, I'll introduce to some of the main building blocks of 5G and certain major challenges ICT and OT industry are working on to be resolved with next releases of 3GPP. Further this presentation examines how the 3GPP-defined 5G architecture will impact industry, especially process and discrete manufacturing. In particular the presentation considers key aspects and service attributes that can help to highlight the differences between deployment scenarios for 3GPP-defined 5G nonpublic networks. In contrast to a network that offers mobile network services to the general public, a 5G non-public network (NPN, also called private or campus network) provides 5G network services to a clearly defined user organization or group of organizations. A number of network implementation options for NPNs based on 3GPP specifications will be described. These range from completely self-contained standalone NPNs that have no connection to the public network, to NPNs that are hosted entirely by public network operators. The main implementation questions will be addressed.
11:00 - 11:30
5G Transforming Industrial IoT Dr. Josef Blanz, Qualcomm CDMA Technologies  
Private LTE networks already serve a wide range of industrial IoT use cases, such as in the mining, oil and gas, sea ports, manufacturing, and logistics sectors. Now, as 5G is here for smartphones, this presentation will investigate how the advanced capabilities of 5G technology can be applied in these environments and enable the transformation to Industry 4.0. Topics to be covered include: • Spectrum to deploy private 5G networks for industrial IoT, from licensed, unlicensed, shared to regionally dedicated • New opportunities for the industrial IoT such as replacing the wired industrial Ethernet and time sensitive networking • The role of 5G NR ultra-reliable low-latency communication (URLLC) and Time Sensitive Networks (TSN) • How Coordinated Multi-point (CoMP) can be used to meet demanding reliability targets • How can co-located networks share the same spectrum with reliability, such as Spatial Division Multiplexing (SDM)
11:30 - 12:00
Private 5G Networks for our Robots and Dairy Cows Harald Naumann, tekmodul  
In this lecture, Harald Naumann will quote from his new book on 5G and point the way to his own private 5G network. The authorization to apply for a private 5G network (campus network) can result from the ownership of the property as well as from any other right of use such as rent, lease or assignment. The frequencies from 3700 MHz to 3800 MHz are not auctioned but allocated upon request. These frequencies are used for automation, industry 4.0, but also for agriculture and forestry. The application procedure is to begin in Q3/A4 2019. In this context, a private mobile radio network is a limited area, logically and/or physically separated from the public radio network. Examples: 1. Network Slice: A radio network in the frequency range of the network operator which belongs to the private network operator and which is logically separated from the public network operator but logically separated. The company receives its turnkey private network slice. 2. Network Slice: A radio network in the frequency range of the property owner that belongs to the private network operator and is logically separated from the public network operator. 3. Hybrid network: For example, the transmission technology in the building is installed and operated by a public network operator. However, the core network and the network functions are operated by the private network operator. 4. Completely private network: Here, the entire radio network is set up and operated by the private operator. The radio technology, transport network and core network is operated separately from the public network on 3700 MHz - 3800 MHz. How to get from the idea to the request at the Bundenetzagentur to the real campus network is explained. We look into our neighbouring countries and point out to who you must contact to set up your own 5G network. If your own 5G network is up and running and goods and vehicles are moving between the locations, then we need the mixed operation of regional private and public radio traffic and SIM cards for both networks. Once you have created your own 5G network, you need the 5G devices. How to make 5G antennas inexpensive for 0 USD is explained in the antenna tutorial I and II. In this lecture, we will briefly explain what you have to pay attention to when developing 5G PCBs and their radio approval. At the end of the presentation, there will be 10 minutes for Q&A followed by consultation after the Wireless Congress in our office in Munich, Hanover or in your office.
12:00 - 12:30
Time Optimization of NB-IoT Networks Zubair Amjad, Offenburg University  
One of the main objectives of 5th generation (5G) cellular networks is to enable Internet of Things (IoT) use cases by providing real-time communication. Thus the requirements and capabilities for 5G extend beyond the Mobile Broadband (MBB) use cases. With the inclusion of Machine Type Communication (MTC) traffic into cellular networks, the increased traffic and number of devices pose a challenge for the network to meet stringent performance requirements in terms of high data rate, improved reliability, and ultra-low latency. Originally, machine type communication was designed for low-bandwidth high-latency applications such as, environmental sensing, smart dustbin, etc., but there is additional demand around applications with low latency requirements, like industrial automation, driver-less cars, and so on [1]. In the proposed talk, the performance and optimization of NB-IoT networks with regard to the latency is discussed. As mentioned earlier, NB-IoT is mainly designed to support low data rate applications that do not require very low latency. However, with an increasing demand of low cost wide range devices, the use case around MTC and IoT require guaranteed ultra-low latency. This could be achieved on one side with high bandwidth devices that do not allow longer battery life, however, on the other hand it is also essential to investigate the potential of narrowband devices such as, NB-IoT for ultra-low latency applications[2]. This talk includes discussion on NB-IoT with a focus on latency reduction [3]. The discussion also includes evaluation of low latency NB-IoT networks from simulations.
12:30 - 13:30
Lunch and Networking Break

Parallel Sessions

13:30 - 16:00
Topic 3 Bluetooth
13:30 - 14:00
Colocating Multiple Wireless Technologies in IoT Products Anders Pettersson, Silicon Labs  
There is no one size fits all when it comes to low-power wireless technologies for IoT devices, and many popular 2.4 GHz options such as Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and Zigbee are achieving good market penetration today. We are also seeing a trend to integrate multiple technologies in a single device to simplify IoT designs and improve the overall user experience. However, this comes with challenges, especially around wireless performance. Take a look at the wireless manuals for many IoT end nodes and hubs, and they will often advise, “Make sure the device is at least 2 meters away from your Wi-Fi access point.” This level of separation is not possible when these wireless technologies are offered in a single device. There are a number of ways designers can help manage colocated wireless technologies to reduce the potential for RF interference: • Choose technologies that are better suited to coexist. • Limit output power to reduce the potential of interference. • Consider IC specifications such as blocking performance. • Implement design techniques to improve antenna isolation. • Provide methods for frequency separation to keep bands from overlapping. Developers must consider all of these techniques and more when designing IoT devices with multiple radios. Without these techniques, the IoT product will likely encounter poor wireless performance that will reflect poorly on both the product itself and the wireless technologies.
14:00 - 14:30
Security Aspects as a key driver to use a proprietary radio protocol Manfred Schommarz, Würth Elektronik  
In a world which is more and more interconnected, in particular through wireless connections, it is indispensable to pay attention to security aspects. Besides software driven security it is equally important to pay attention on the radio protocol. With the WE-ProWare radio protocol from Würth Elektronik eiSos we will display how easy it is to avoid security pitfalls from the very beginning by using an ISM frequency band.
14:30 - 15:00
Revolutionary Simplicity - Smart Home via Bluetooth Mesh Dr. Ralf Hinkel, frogblue  
The smart home solutions from frogblue are based purely decentrally on intelligent control modules, the so-called frogs. The Frogs have Bluetooth LE on board, because the world standard guarantees systems that can be scaled, consumes minimal energy and offers the highest possible level of safety. In addition, all messages and data between the frogs or to the frogblue smartphone app are encrypted once again with 128 bit. The lecture shows why frogblue is based on Bluetooth and how, in contrast to other smart home solutions, the highest possible security can be guaranteed.
15:00 - 15:30
Second Generation Beacons Enrich Content and Accuracy with Bluetooth 5.1 Joe Tillison, Silicon Labs  
In this session, we will review how Bluetooth Low Energy (LE) beacons are used to enable proximity-aware applications on smartphones, cover basic use cases of beacons with real-world examples for the IoT, and then explain how beacons are enhanced with the latest features of Bluetooth 5.1 and upcoming releases. These features include secondary advertising channels, BLE coded PHYs, and Angle-of-Arrival (AoA) technology. The session shows how these new features will enable advanced beacons with more complexity, longer range and more location precision for enhancing proximity aware applications. We explain the hardware and software components used in the construction of a beacon product and provide detailed explanations of the iBeacon and Eddystone advertisement packets to show how easy it is to implement BLE beacons. We will also address some of the emerging concerns for privacy and security surrounding Bluetooth beacons.
15:30 - 16:00
Coffee and Networking Break
13:30 - 15:00
Topic 4 Localisation
13:30 - 14:00
Enabling 5G NR Massive MIMO Deployments Harpinder Matharu, Xilinx  
Enhanced mobile broadband is the leading use case for 5G NR as deployments pick up pace in 2HCY19. 5G NR standard coupled with availability of mid-bands and high-bands holds the promise of delivering much higher throughput per user at a lower cost. This enables operators to not only keep up with the perpetual growth in demand for network capacity, with network throughput demand doubling every 15-18 months, but also lay the foundation for new use cases and services. Massive MIMO is the keystone technology in 5G NR for realizing desired capacity improvements by leveraging underutilized spectrum below 6GHz and above 6 GHz. Higher footprint, power and cost due to multifold increase in system complexity in implementing massive MIMO radios is a major hurdle. This presentation talks about technology innovations to address multifold increase in compute requirements in massive MIMO radio and beamforming, backhaul and fronthaul challenges in disaggregated base stations, and Artificial Intelligence/ Machine learning applications for improving base station scheduler and beam management to enable 5G NR massive MIMO deployments.
14:00 - 14:30
Tracking & Tracing with the Sigfox 0G-Network Stefan Huber, Sigfox Germany  
The localization of assets previously required a complex interaction of different technologies and methods. For assets in motion often GSM based GNSS trackers are used to transfer the location data. For local identification, RFID or barcode scanners are a common method. Bluetooth based beacons are an alternative to automatically and precisely activate location based services. Despite the high complexity and cost the logistics and parcel market still uses such solutions to track their assets. But today there is a better way to directly and seamlessly track any asset from hand luggage to pallets and containers in real-time. The 0G network from Sigfox provides a global, roaming-cost free data transfer to the clouds to continuously be informed on the location as well as relevant status data like temperature, humidity or vibration. Moreover it automatically provides a network integrated localization service that needs no additional components. Even indoor tracking is possible with Sigfox. Tracking can be provided in various accuracy flavors ranging from Sigfox only to WLAN or GNSS depending on the accuracy required. All this is provided at minimum power levels compared to any other data transmission channel towards the cloud. That is why leading global companies such as Airbus, Air Liquide, Groupe PSA and Total as well as even Louis Vuitton are already relying on Sigfox. Sigfox will present the range of technologies that OEMs and service providers can leverage to improve all their various tracking and tracing tasks based on the information provided at partners.sigfox.com. The presentation shall also provide a more detailed look into the solution used by one of the world’s largest logistic service providers which is a well known Germany based company.
14:30 - 15:00
Introduction to UWB Network Topologies and Applications Kenneth Dwyer, Decawave  
Embedding intelligence into products be it a smartphone, AGV or an edge device today is easier than ever with newer technologies, smaller silicon geometries, power efficiency and innovation among the driving forces. Providing precise location could be considered as a form of intelligence. Accurately providing the ‘Where’ information of an object to a system or to the cloud is information that can be acted upon in a smart fashion, real time. Of course, precision location data has already been possible for some time with GPS for example - but it does not solve the location indoors challenge. That is where Ultra-Wideband comes to the fore. Already standardized under the IEEE standard, 802.15.4a, UWB is now gaining even more momentum, with UWB systems deployed worldwide in industrial safety, manufacturing, agriculture, hospitals, consumer and automotive products. The recent birth of the UWB Alliance exemplifies the industry momentum with kingpins like Apple, BMW, NXP joining the UWB party. Now new homologation efforts with 802.15.4z on the horizon. This presentation will introduce UWB, compare various topologies for UWB location systems illustrating where and when they are suitable and discuss the trade-offs of each type in the real world. Some examples are: TWR - Two Way Ranging: This is in some ways the most basic system yet still powerful providing geo fencing capabilities for keyless entry systems, safety and security applications. We will show this working in practice with a live demo. TDoA - Time Difference of Arrival: A more sophisticated system requiring more infrastructure deployment with the capability to track 1000’s of assets or objects. Again, a demo of the system will be shown. Figure 1 TDoA system Topology Example PDoA – Phase difference of arrival: Here the distance between objects and the x,y in space can be precisely determined enabling novel applications such as ‘follow me’ robotics. Real world examples of consumer products utilizing this solution will be shown. Use cases describing utilization of complementary technologies like BLE and augmenting the UWB location data with IMU or sensor fusion to give even better precision in harsher environments will be also presented. We will also discuss the next generation UWB products that will incorporate the latest 4z standard. These devices and networks will be more secure, use lower power and use worldwide accepted CH9 while providing backward support for popular CH5 networks.
15:00 - 16:00
Topic 5 Energy Management
15:00 - 15:30
Energy Solutions for Health & Medical Wireless Applications Andreas Warta, VARTA Microbattery  
The energy solutions for Health & Medical Wireless Applications – Batteries are one of the most important parts in the design of a new Health & Medical device, nowadays the battery takes a huge part of the entire volume of the device. The performance, size and running time of the battery, define how smart and user-friendly the device will be. VARTA Microbattery cell technologies combines important features for Health & Medical Wireless Applications – small size, high energy density, high drain capability, mechanical stability and long lifetime. The speech will highlight future trends and the highest efficiency of rechargeable and primary battery solutions.
15:30 - 16:00
Coffee and Networking Break

Parallel Sessions

16:00 - 18:00
Topic 3 Bluetooth
16:00 - 16:30
High Accuracy, Secure Ranging and Localization on Future Bluetooth Radios Christian Bachmann, imec  
The next wave in wireless innovation will bring high accuracy and secure ranging capabilities to tomorrow’s smart devices, empowering a more intuitive and seamless interaction with physical objects in the world around us. Wireless technologies such as ultra-wideband (UWB) and Bluetooth will make use of these capabilities to address a wide range of new use cases. Examples are secure, keyless access enabled by smart locks and accurate indoor localization both in buildings and vehicles, for increased safety as well as highly personalized in-vehicle comfort and entertainment. In this talk, we will give you an overview of current solutions and recent innovations, such as phase-based ranging on Bluetooth radios, reaching accuracies better than 30 centimeters – which is over 10 times better than current approaches. Furthermore, we will discuss advanced security measures enabling resistance against wireless relay station attacks, addressing a growing concern in the secure access market.
16:30 - 17:00
Data Streaming in Real Time Using Bluetooth Low Energy Rudi Latuske, OpenSynergy  
Bluetooth Low Energy (BTLE) was originally developed to address the constraints imposed by batteries that are used in untethered devices. The communications channel is designed around a TDMA structure with a very low duty cycle. Short intermittent transmissions do not tax battery power and device longevity is maximized with battery replacement taking years instead of weeks or months. Audio streaming was impossible... until now. BLE is introducing an isochronous channel that supports data streaming, opening up many new possibilities for a low energy technology. One such use case addresses the hearing aid market. This presentation will provide a brief review of how isochronous channels work in BLE with a view toward the implementation of a voice bearing channel such as handsfree or hearing aid application.
17:00 - 17:30
The Internet of Things for Non-Critical Medical Srinivas Pattamatta, Atmosic Technologies  
From hospital patient tags to asset tracking, the Internet of Things (IoT) is crucial to connecting thousands of healthcare devices working silently to improve the lives of patients, medical staff and visitors. Now more than ever, IoT is pivotal to maintain hospitals and improve patient care. In this session, Atmosic vice president of business development Srinivas Pattamatta, will cover how technologies like wearables and other IoT devices drive a growing dependence on connectivity in hospitals. Pattamatta will explain how Bluetooth 5 and energy harvesting can drastically cut costs and save time for both patients and healthcare professionals. Along with patient monitoring, this discussion will explore asset tracking in hospitals and how to employ more efficient systems so equipment can be observed and accounted for via a smart phone app or tablet, saving hundreds of hours in manual labor that comes with taking inventory. Real-world case studies will demonstrate how using Lowest Power Bluetooth 5, On-demand Wake-up and Energy Harvesting conserve power and extend battery life to allow asset tracking beacons to run through their lifespan, essentially eliminating losses in medical assets and saving thousands in costs, along with other benefits IoT delivers in the non-critical medical arena.
17:30 - 18:00
Behavioral Recognition Applications Using a Low-Cost BLE Based Sensor Platform for Electromagnetic Field Distribution Monitoring Gerrit Maus, University of Wuppertal  
Behavioral and situational recognition based on electromagnetic field distribution is a challenging research field with a huge number of possible applications. Examples published so far cover applications like indoor localization, personal identification and a variety of behavioral recognition studies. Although there are established and industry-ready frameworks based on video cameras or radar, these systems have some severe drawbacks with respect to cost and privacy issues. Thus, solutions operating in the licence-free 2.45 GHz ISM band have been also considered in the past decade for this kind of applications and are now important objects of study. Since the RF field strength information is generated already by many commercially available RF chipsets, low-cost modules for field strength monitoring can be build up easily for everyday use. We developed a low-cost BLE based sensor platform that is capable of measuring channel- specific field strength information within mesh network topologies. With an accuracy of 0.2 dB and sampling rates of up to 5 kHz it is suited for efficient received signal strength monitoring of fast changing radio signals in dynamic environments. Each sensor is battery-driven and can be remotely controlled which allows nearly arbitrary laboratory settings. There have been high-quality research studies during the past years using existing frameworks, e. g. WiFi-CSI or Zigbee based solutions. However, none of them fits all the needs with regard to high sampling rates, measurement accuracy, low-cost and low-power. In this contribution an overview about the features of the proposed sensor platform is given and some technical details of its protocol design are discussed. Furthermore, some performance results of example applications are presented and a preview of future work focusing on personal identification and on car traffic monitoring is given.
16:00 - 18:00
Topic 5 Energy Management
16:00 - 16:30
Beyond the Data Sheet: Considerations for Calculating Battery Life for Wireless IoT Devices Anders Pettersson, Silicon Labs  
Data sheets can often be confusing, especially when it comes to understanding power consumption. Chip vendors seldom have a standard method for power consumption parameters in data sheets. In addition, there are many other factors that must be considered that may not be adequately covered in the data sheet, such as various wakeup times, radio transition times, peripheral activity, transmit (TX) and receive (RX) on time, etc. In addition, the software stacks themselves can also have an impact and the efficiency can vary among vendors as well. This session will explore the critical items to consider beyond the data sheet and look at real-world calculators Silicon Labs has developed to benchmark battery life for IoT applications using Zigbee, Bluetooth Low Energy and Bluetooth mesh protocols. In this session, we will discuss how to evaluate a wide range of data sheet specifications for wireless devices including the following: • Active, RX, TX and sleep mode • Wakeup times • RX/TX transitions • Duty cycle • Application usage (e.g., wireless sensors) • Actual sleep current based on software stacks (how much memory, what is retained) • Peripheral reflex system (a Silicon Labs MCU/SoC feature) and peripheral activity while MCU or processor core is in sleep/idle mode
16:30 - 17:00
Sensing Everything, Everywhere: Towards Zero Battery Stéphane Emery, CSEM  
For most of the IoT applications, high wireless throughput and high processing power are not required. This talk will describe the implementation of a very low power microcontroller chip associated with optimized machine learning accelerators that together enable the creation of exciting applications purely based on energy harvesting. On one hand, a clever use of the existing CMOS technology allows to reduce the power consumption of the chips needed for an IoT node to a few uW. On the other hand the signals gathered from the sensors are processed locally, in the sensing node, in order to extract only the quintessential and relevant information; this allows to minimize the amount of data to be transmitted and thus the required energy. Several examples of systems making use of these techniques will be presented.
17:00 - 17:30
Access Control Powered by Energy Harvesting from Door Handle Prof. Dr. Juan-Mario Gruber, ZHAW Institute of Embedded Systems  
This paper presents an energy autarkic system for entrance control powerd by energy harvesting of the door handle movement. It is designed for mounting in a conventional door. The access control system includes an energy harvester, an NFC transceiver IC, a microcontroller, a power management circuit for energy control, a voltage regulator and a stepper motor for unlocking the door. The aim of the energy autarkic system is to read out an NFC tag from the converted energy to carry out a subse-quent authentication. If authentication is successful, the door will be unlocked. The entire process requires 117 mJ (incl. 30% safety margin). The energy harvester is realized using a state-of-the-art stepper motor that converts mechanical movement into alternating current. To guarantee that enough energy is available, it is equipped with a two-stage gearbox with a total ratio of 10:1. The output voltage is converted into regulated 3.3 V and stored in a supercapacitor. A power management circuit monitors the voltage level at the energy storage by means of a voltage reference and a comparator with hysteresis. Microcontroller and NFC transceiver are supplied with voltage when sufficient energy is available. At the beginning the memory (in this case a supercapacitor) is empty. When the door handle is pressed, energy is con-verted until a predefined threshold voltage is reached. For this purpose, a power management circuit was designed, which consists of a voltage reference, a Schmitt trigger and a CMOS output stage. At the beginning, the user must place the NFC tag on the reader. As soon as the door handle has been pressed, mechanical energy is converted into electrical energy. If the NFC tag is considered authorized, the door is unlocked, and the user can open the door. When the door handle is pressed, 125 mJ of electrical energy is converted. 1.1 mJ is required to start and initialize the microcontroller. The reading and following authentication consume about 6.8 mJ. The low power solenoid motor needs 50 mJ to unlock the door. This yields a total consumption of 67 mJ and a reserve of 58 mJ to be stored in the capacitor.
17:30 - 18:00
WAIC Compatible Communication System for Current Sensing in Aircrafts Philippe Dallemagne, CSEM  
The Ampwise platform offers secure, autonomous and resilient wireless communication, for the periodic measurement of electrical return current in aircrafts. The paper briefly describes the challenges, the chosen approaches and solutions and preliminary results. It summarises the analysis of the main application requirements, the operational parameters and constraints (including size and weight), as well as the basic specification of the system and its components (physical layer, MAC and application protocols, power supply, current sensor, etc.). The sensor nodes are installed for the entire lifetime of the aircraft. While the time requirements of the application are not very stringent, the availability of the data is of utmost importance for the safety, performance and operational efficiency of new generation commercial aircrafts. The high-level architecture and its interfaces, the principles of the sensor acquisition and data transmission complete the system description. The ultra low power wireless communication system is built on top of a physical layer operating in the 4.2-4.4 GHz Wireless Avionics Intra-Communications (WAIC) band dedicated to local wireless communications within aircrafts. The communication system also comprises the protocol stack offering services to the target applications, such as periodic transmission of acquired samples, security establishment, synchronization, redundancy and robustness support. The Ampwise network is primarily made of energy autonomous wireless current sensor nodes (SN) aiming at remotely monitoring the return electrical current in the airframe of modern commercial aircrafts. It is structured around a Wireless Data Concentrator (WDC) that interconnects to the aircraft systems and its avionics, up to 300 autonomous SNs that are installed near the aircraft electrical lines. A second WDC monitors the activity of the first WDC to provide redundancy for network orchestration and fault-tolerance. The SNs and the pair of WDCs form a cell, which uses a radio communication protocol to interact, exchange data and commands, while meeting real-time properties and exhibiting robustness and resilience to the adversarial operating conditions of the aeronautic environments, in particular propagation and interference. Several cells can coexist in an aircraft, to cover the entire airframe. The sensor nodes and the WDC comprise an antenna and a transceiver, which, due to the absence of WAIC compliant hardware, is currently made of a 2.4 GHz radio coupled with a frequency converter. The Ampwise SN comprises an energy harvesting device, for which several options have been considered, e.g. thermal energy generator and current flow harvesters. The paper concludes by giving an evaluation of the power balance between the energy consumption and the potential generation of the energy harvester. The AMPWISE project is partly funded by the European Union’s H2020 through Clean Sky 2 Programme under Grant Agreement 785495.
16:00 - 18:00
Tutorial IP500 Alliance
16:00 - 16:30
IP500 Standard – EN Pro-Conformed by VdS, Wireless IoT Standard for Commercial Buildings Helmut Adamski, IP500 Alliance  
For the last two decades, the wireless IoT industry has announced many wireless standards for SmartCity applications (like 5G or LoRa) or for SmartHomes (e.g. ZigBee or WiFi). However, none of these wireless standards addressed the Security / Safety applications for Commercial Buildings and Industrial objects. Individual OEMs and lager players have announced their proprietary wireless connected OEM products (i.e. for intrusion, smoke applications). But these solutions are not providing the needed performance (highest data rate at long range), scalability, robustness and ultra-low power consumption, as well as mobility at the same time, based on the IEEE 802.15.4 and the IPv6 / 6LowPAN standards. On top of that, no other wireless IoT standards have the EN pre-conformity by VdS. The IP500 Alliance have worked closely with major OEMs and IoT technology players in partnership with VdS and TÜV Rheinland to specify the most performing and robust Wireless IoT Standard for Commercial Buildings. The IP500 Alliance has announced the worldwide first wireless IoT Standard which is an EN pre-conform by VdS wireless platform for security applications, based on an advanced true IEEE dual-band and IPv6 meshing network technology. The comparison between the IP500 meshing and a “line of sight” wireless standard will demonstrate why the IP500 Standard has been chosen to the EN pre-conformed by VdS.
16:30 - 17:00
Redundant IoT Infrastructure with Fault Tolerant Data Management Florian Schintke, ZUSE Institute, Berlin  
The IP500 ECO System also provides a highly scalable and redundant wireless IoT infrastructure solution (IP500 Gateways) for large sensor networks in commercial buildings. The presentation in partnership with the ZUSE Institute will show how the IP500 network is able to connect all sensing nodes to a fully redundant wireless Mesh-Network in security applications (EN & VdS conform). The IP500 ECO Solution and the Network Technology if the only IoT solution worldwide providing such a high redundancy and security for large commercial buildings. In case of a defect of a gateway, the neighbor gateway nearby will automatically take over the connectivity the SmartDevices, which lost the gateway. Such infrastructure technology is important for building owners and i.e. facility managers, because it guaranties constant connectivity of the SmartDevices to the BMS.
17:00 - 17:30
Planner Want Full Interoperability between Security & Comfort Devices Holger Wallmeier, Siganet  
The goal of a Planner, Architect and System Integrator is to have “Freedom in the Design Phase and in the Installation phase of SmartDevices”, especially in commercial buildings. This session will demonstrate the scalability and interoperability of the IP500 ECO Networks / System as the wireless IoT platform for all SmartDevices – security and comfort sensors & actors. Because of the pre-conformation by VdS, the IP500 Standard allows to combine security application with comfort applications, using the same IP500 wireless infrastructure. Holger will then explain the great chllanges of any other IoT solutiuons and why the IP500 ECO solution is supporting an BIM in the various planning and installation phases.
17:30 - 18:00
IP500 BMS Solution for Commercial Building Automation & Mobility Applications Armin Kaltenbacher, PcVue  
A seamless integration of wireless SmartDevices requires full interoperability of the key elements in a wireless IoT network. The data rate and the battery lifetime of the individual smart sensors devices, located around a commercial building, must be installed at a low price tag with lowest “low maintenance” cost. The track session will demonstrate how a Buidling Management System (BMS) will handle and integrated all data points in an entire SmartIndustry / Building project with highest scalability, flexibility and interoperability of all SmartDevices and why end-users are able run an IP500 network at a most efficient, secure and easy-to-install user interface (GUI).

Parallel Sessions

18:00 - 20:00
Get-together Networking Event
18:00 - 20:00
We invite all participants to our annual get-together in the networking/exhibition area

Day 2 - Wednesday, 23. October 2019

Parallel Sessions

09:00 - 11:00
Opening Session Keynote
09:00 - 09:30
Industrial 5G – Getting ready for the Factory of the Future Dr. Andreas Müller, Bosch  
5G may have a significant impact on manufacturing and enable unprecedented degrees of flexibility, versatility, usability and productivity. At the same time, the industrial domain is one of the most attractive new application domains addressed by 5G with a huge market potential. While many activities and discussions around industrial 5G have ramped up in the last 1-2 years, it is finally getting real. Thanks to the increasing availability of 5G spectrum, suitable technical enablers in the standards and a quickly growing ecosystem, the widespread use of 5G in factories is on the doorstep. This talk will give an overview of the status quo of industrial 5G, outline the huge potential it comes along with and summarize various remaining challenges that are yet to be addressed.
09:30 - 10:00
The Future Becomes Mobile Helmut Schnierle, Telefonica  
I. Cost/benefit comparison of mobile to "wired" solutions. II. Broadband connections versus narrowband connections (NBIOT). III. New versus existing SIM providers for roaming in Europe (and worldwide) - what makes the difference?
10:00 - 10:30
Panel Discussion: Private 5G Networks in Germany and the World - When and Where to Use? Chair: Prof. Dr. Axel Sikora, Offenburg University / Hahn-Schickard
10:30 - 11:00
Coffee and Networking Break

Parallel Sessions

11:00 - 13:30
Topic 6 Technology
11:00 - 11:30
An Automatic Framework for Reliable and Repeatable Ad-Hoc Network Simulations Peter Gjøl Jensen, Aalborg University  
Distributed and parallel algorithms, like protocols for ad-hoc wireless networks, are notoriously hard to develop and debug, as well as to measure their performance in a consistent manner. We present a self-contained, modular simulation-framework for analysing such wireless network protocols. Our framework is based on the statistical model-checker UPPAAL (www.uppaal.org) and allows us to utilize a domain-specific visualization frontend, specifically targeted towards the networking applications. Our contribution consists of three different core-components: a Connectivity Simulator (ConSim), a Virtualized Hardware Unit (VHU), and web-based visualization interface. The key part of our framework is the ConSim component that computes the collisions and connectivity in the (possibly dynamic) wireless network. This allows us to simulate realistic scenarios as the component accepts as input a GPS-log-based dynamic network topology together with RSSI-values. Such a topology can be achieved either from field measurements or it can be synthetized from behavioural models. The ConSim module can replay the log, coordinate it with the VHU and compute realistic cross-talk collisions based on a probabilistic link model. We use here a pseudo-random number generator, in order to ensure the repeatability of the simulations. For the radio hardware simulation, we design the VHU framework that relies on the implementation of a few radio-hardware specific communication primitives (send packet, listen and receive a packet, sleep), each instantiated by the specific frequency-band/channel to communicate on. This allows us to simulate both the existing implementations of mesh network protocols as well as quick prototyping via mock implementations or even model-based realizations via e.g. UPPAAL. Last but not least, we develop a web visualization frontend, enabling easy and highly configurable visualization of both statistical measures of aggregated simulations of the protocol as well as an animated visualization of single protocol runs. The fronted is accompanied by a server, allowing for the encapsulation and hiding of the protocol implementation, facilitating a platform for potential customers to make self-driven scenario-based evaluation of a product. On a concrete instance of meshed network protocol developed by Neocortec and instantiated by LinkAiders for the use case of disaster warning infrastructure at Philippines (funded by EUROSTARS project Reachi), we demonstrate the feasibility and usefulness of our framework simulations for thousands of handheld devices (nodes)---something that is very difficult and expensive to test on this scale during the field tests. We compare our simulated results with those obtained by real measurements on a small-scale hardware test-bed developed by Neocortec and we argue for an acceptable conformance between the simulated and real-life behaviour.
11:30 - 12:00
Practical Experience with EM Simulations for RF Designs Rashid Talib, Arendi  
Thanks to today’s computing power, simulation of complex RF structures have become very feasible. This opens a completely new world of design and development possibilities for new products. What is the benefit of EM Simulations and in when does it pay off to go with an EM Simulation instead of following the traditional RF design path? Our speech will touch this question by showing the possibilities and restrictions of EM Simulations based on our project experience.
12:00 - 12:30
Radio Regulatory Requirements for the IoT Dr. Simon Hindle, Element  
The growth of the IoT has added new challenges for product manufacturers as they attempt to keep up. In many cases this has involved the addition of a wireless radio to otherwise traditional devices. The use of protocols such as Bluetooth, zigbee, z-wave, etc have added certification logo requirements but the addition of this radio also brings with it new challenges in terms of regulation and homologation. This presentation explores the impact in both cost and time which the addition of this new radio functionality has to product development. It also looks at common regulations which exist in Europe and North America including the new Radio Equipment Directive (RED) and FCC requirements. The presentation will provide a reference point to allow product designers and project managers to understand the impact these radio regulations can have on their development plans.
12:30 - 13:30
Lunch and Networking Break
11:00 - 13:30
Topic 7 Industrial IoT
11:00 - 11:30
IoT Networks: How to Choose? Hervé Bibollet, Adeunis  
Would you like to rely on IoT to meet your business challenges? Guaranteeing the performance of installations, optimising the use and comfort of buildings, all while improving the organisation of services, are issues that can be mastered thanks to IoT! But which network(s) to choose? In brief, what criteria should be considered when making your choice… Low-speed networks: use these networks to send feedback at regular intervals or about events with the state of a device. Know your goals To properly define your IoT project, and ensure its performance, the priority is to start from expectations, and the challenges that the project must meet. Do you want to reduce the operating costs of managing a tertiary building park by intervening in the right time? The IoT permanently allows you to have visibility on the status of connected equipment through your sensors and thus be able to intervene on site when necessary. Are you a service provider who is selling an ongoing maintenance service to a building manager? IoT allows you to know variations of temperature, humidity and brightness and to receive alerts if the threshold is exceeded in order to undertake the necessary maintenance and servicing. Define the important criteria: density, network coverage, security, etc. The best solution is the one that takes into account your needs, your uses and your project’s environment, for example: • Quality of the “network coverage” • Sensor distribution • Within a building, installation inside, outside or underground • Number of sensors to deploy and desired communication frequency • Sensor safety and lifespan • Cost of subscriptions If the network coverage does not correspond to your needs in every respect, you can add extension solutions for more coverage offered by IoT operators or develop your own private network. If we take the example of Citycare, with one defibrillator per public building, the most relevant solution (given the equipment distribution) is to rely on a public network offering national coverage. On the contrary, if we consider the technical management of a University Hospital, from the opening of the roof access doors to the remote reading of the meters located in the hospital’s third-level basement, the installation of a private network appears more suitable considering the number of sensors deployed locally and the sensor distribution constraints (from “deep indoor” to outdoors). Will the next networks disrupt the existing ecosystem? We see the complementarity rather than a confrontation. If we take the example of challenge Orange – Sncf which aimed to detect a human or animal intrusion in a tunnel, thanks to the LTE-M, we were able to propose a solution integrating sound and image in real time to help operators remove any lingering doubts. On the other hand, this solution remains more expensive and energy-consuming than a LoRa or Sigfox solution and is not necessarily adapted to the needs of sending alerts or status change data, for example.
11:30 - 12:00
Overcoming Challenges with IQRF Mesh Networks in Smart Cities and Industry 4.0 Sebastian Hopp, IQRF Tech  
Smart cities and Industry 4.0 can be quite a challenging environments for IoT applications due to high noise, unpredictable setup or deployment issues to name but a few. IQRF for many years has been working on reducing those and other challenges for designers of IoT applications to make them as easy to set up, deploy and function in a real environment. Transceivers, IDE, SDK, Gateways, Gateway daemons, ready protocols, high-security standards – it’s all there at IQRF to offer a complete solution for your fast prototyping or a solution. In this short presentation, IQRF will try to show how you can use all the tools and pieces of the IoT puzzle to make your life easier when creating IoT design.
12:00 - 12:30
NeoMesh - 2nd Generation Wireless Mesh Network Thomas Steen Halkier, Neocortec  
When designing products which relies on wireless communication, selecting between the multitude of wireless technologies available can be challenging. Wireless Mesh Networks has been around for more than two decades and experience has been gathered from many different use cases in most industries. NeoMesh is building on the experience gathered from legacy mesh network technologies, and has been improved in key areas to ensure a high degree of reliability, scalability and at the same time allowing nodes to operate on batteries for many years. This presentation will introduce the audience to NeoMesh, explaining how the technology has been build up from the core to ensure cable-like reliability and ultra low power consumption for all nodes in the network. Examples of NeoMesh implementations will be presented to show how the high degree of flexibility of the wireless system is utilised in applications ranging from passenger ship evacuation systems where reliability and durability is essential, to sensor networks in churches and office buildings where the meshing of the radio links allows for connectivity in hard to reach places.
12:30 - 13:30
Lunch and Networking Break

Parallel Sessions

13:30 - 15:30
Topic 8 LPWAN
13:30 - 14:00
IoT Applications Wolfgang Esch, WEPTECH elektronik  
IoT applications with mobile radio connectivity in practice - The switch from xG to NB IoT The trend of IoT applications goes from the well-known 2G, 3G and 4G connections to the new NB IoT technology. This promises higher ranges, long battery life and low operating costs. Can all applications be easily converted or are there limitations? The following projects will explain the challenges and differences. The differences in hardware are shown, but also the changes in communication with a cloud or the server.
14:00 - 14:30
A Comparison of The Energy Requirements of Sigfox, LoRaWAN, NB-IoT Prof. Dr. Marcel Meli, ZHAW Institute of Embedded Systems; David Lorenz, ZHAW Institute of Embedded Systems  
Several wireless systems are claiming the "Low-Power" label and operations over several years on a small battery. It is not always obvious to make sense of those claims or to compare the systems and derive conclusions on the basis of the documentation that is available. Information about energy requirements is however very important in designing systems that should last for several years or work on harvested energy. We took a practical and pragmatic approach, and measured the energy requirements of several transceivers that can be used for popular LPWAN systems such as Sigfox, LoRaWAN, NB-IoT. The selected transceivers or SoCs are currently on the market. We recorded their power profiles in several configurations. In this presentation, we will explain the factors that influence the energy requirements for those LPWAN systems, discuss the methodology we used for the measurements and present the results of our evaluation.
14:30 - 15:00
Practical Experiences and Analysis of the LoRa Physical Layer for LPWANs Dr. Timo Dammes, Lemonbeat  
Low power wide area networks (LPWANs) have become an enabling technology for applications where distributed, mains- or battery powered sensor nodes are to be connected to a central gateway instance. An example are metering applications, where battery-powered devices may have to span lifecycles of 10 or more years while delivering metering data on daily or hourly basis and covering outdoor ranges of up to multiple kilometers in dense urban environments or indoor ranges of 10 or more floors within larger residual buildings. Currently employed technologies for LPWAN solutions include LTE NB-IoT, LTE-M, Sigfox, and LoRaWAN, which differ in their physical and MAC layer implementation and their potential for realizing low power and low complexity nodes. Additionally, all these technologies are adopted by commercial network service providers to run cellular IOT networks. Depending on business cases, manufacturers of IOT devices might, however, prefer decentralized, provider-independent connectivity solutions which can be operated in license-free frequency bands. Realizing such requires a deep understanding of the key performance parameters of the physical layer in practical scenarios: the potential for low power realization, the spatial range for indoor and outdoor channels, and the immunity to self-interference in the multiple access case. These parameters are closely connected and determine product lifetime of a battery powered node, required gateway density, and overall throughput of a loaded network, respectively. The Long Range (LoRa) physical layer developed by Cycleo/Semtech is based on a chirp spread spectrum modulation. It has been adopted to realize LPWANs and appears to be a promising approach to meet the named requirements. However, LoRa is a closed technology where the detailed physical layer specification is not open to public. This paper provides an independent study of the baseband signal processing for LoRa modulation and presents practical experience regarding indoor-indoor and indoor-outdoor range as well as measurement results of the self-interference property of LoRa spreading sequences. Based on these results, a statistical model of a LoRa network node is presented which is then used to develop a large-scale network simulator for LoRa based networks. The simulator provides insight into the expected network throughput depending on the spatial node densities and the employed multiple access schemes and the configured transmission interval of the individual nodes. The latter is also strongly connected to the expected battery lifetime of the embedded device itself and the number of neighboring devices and gateways in radio range. By analyzing this trade-off, it is shown under which circumstances and at which level the key parameters low power and wide range can be achieved. Finally, recommendations for the involved system parameters in practical scenarios are provided.
15:00 - 15:30
Coffee and Networking Break
13:30 - 15:30
Topic 7 Industrial IoT
13:30 - 14:00
The Digital Twin Thomas Weisshaupt, Wirepas  
Building – the digital twin Corridors are not the only thing connecting Smart Buildings Building an ecosystem of solution providers joined together is the base for the way of working with Wirepas Mesh. It offers a horizontal technological solution and on top of which solution providers can build their solutions. The technology enables all the solutions to use the same network without interference to each other or other networks and collect all the data into a central system. A system integrator combines all the data into one backend with business intelligence and a visualisation company ensures that the users have a real time digital twin of the building. In the presentation we will demonstrate the whole architecture of how the solution is brought together. The network, acting as a foundation that can connect all the needed lighting fixtures, sensors measuring (e.g. air quality, temperature and humidity and also doing indoor positioning), already enables many use cases. The positioning data gets forwarded to visualisation platforms to ensure that workers find assets as easily as possible. The same technology also needs to be able to send Bluetooth beacons that any smart device can understand to enable e.g. wireless light switches and way finding. We will present the technology and the combination of many solution providers operating in just one network - making the deployment turned into fast and easy horizontal solution. At UMC hospital in Utrecht Fujitsu and Systematic worked together with Wirepas to test positioning of fundamental equipment on a temporarily closed children’s ward. Fujitsu provided the anchor devices for reference points and also the tags that were located. Systematic provided the visualisation that using the data collected with the Wirepas Mesh network and Wirepas Mesh Positioning Engine calculated the location. Gooee used Ingy hardware to show how to control lighting in a hospital using the same network as the positioning and the light fixtures were also acting as anchor devices for location reference. EnOcean switches provided wireless switches to control the lights and indoo.rs realized the way finding app with the beacons. Presenting this use case for smart building applications, we will discuss the implementation, architecture and integration of the Wirepas Positioning Engine. We will also demonstrate how real time data collection enables to creation of a digital twin of the building with all its functions and applications. Tieto Empathic Building has also been able to combine multiple operators and technologies to ensure their office environment solution. Haltian devices are connected with Wirepas Mesh and they sense e.g. occupancy of the meeting rooms. This removes the need for meeting room reservations as free rooms can be seen on a map real-time. A network that can serve a horizontal range of solutions is the foundation for a complete digital twin of a building – and this is exactly what Wirepas is enabling right now
14:00 - 14:30
Industrial Real-Time Communication Using Wireless TSN and DECT David Rahusen, Stackforce  
DECT, the forefather of radio standards, and ULE, its modern extension for Low-Power data communication. For the world of industrial IoT, the DECT ULE radio standard closes the gap between “short range high data rate” radio standards (e.g. WiFi) and “long range low data rate” radio standards (e.g. LPWANs like LoRaWAN and Sigfox). In addition, there are several reasons why DECT ULE, beside cellular networks, is a very capable radio standard for industrial and even has the potential to be a better suitable approach for real-time communication than cellular networks for certain use cases.
14:30 - 15:00
Considerations on Safe Wireless Machine and Robot Operation in Industrial Use Christian Huettner, KEBA  
Safe wireless machine operation is a niche in safe machine operation for over a decade now. Most machine and robot manufactures still prefer to equip their systems with tethered devices. The reasons why safe mobile operation is decided might be differing from what mobile devices are easily capable of. Fast reaction of moving axes upon pressed or released hardware keys is a must and cannot be easily accomplished with wireless solutions. E-Stop should trigger a safe machine stop but must not pause a complete line from operation. Solutions arise and disappear, new safety components offer new solutions, which new approaches are possible is covered in the talk. Further the presentation covers the question why in a world where radio communication is ubiquitous does the industry seem to procrastinate? The presentation looks at the reasons and tries to provide an answer and give a statement why this could change soon. Does the industry wait for 5G or does it need 5G in order to solve the current issues and if or how are security issues delaying progress is touched as well. Usability aspects are discussed as well as regulatory issues with their consequences for international industrial (robot) applications.
15:00 - 15:30
Coffee and Networking Break

Parallel Sessions

15:30 - 17:30
Topic 9 Security
15:30 - 16:00
Using Secure Microcontrollers in IoT Applications: Insights from a Hands-on Evaluation Tobias Schläpfer, ZHAW Institute of Embedded Systems  
Nowadays, security in wireless IoT devices is a major topic. Rising awareness and up-coming regulations will force manufacturers to increase the level of security on their IoT devices. Particularly, it is a challenge to leverage existing, well-known computer security algorithms to battery powered and resource constrained IoT devices. For this reason, ARM has introduced their TrustZone® technology, enabling the secure execution of trusted software. With the new generation of secure microcontrollers introduced by various semiconductor vendors, the technology is now available for battery powered IoT devices. Furthermore, these secure microcontrollers provide additional security features, such as hardware accelerators for cryptographic operations, secure key storage and sophisticated random number generators. The paper introduces the concepts behind ARM TrustZone®, using these new secure microcontrollers and provides an overview of their features. It demonstrates specific application examples such as secure boot and the execution of cryptographic software using TrustZone®. Furthermore, the paper presents power measurements of the implemented examples, comparing them to the execution on conventional microcontrollers without TrustZone®. Finally, the paper summarizes advantages and weaknesses of secure microcontrollers compared to dedicated off-chip solutions like secure elements.
16:00 - 16:30
Security Concepts for Embedded IOT Devices Jan Geldmacher, Lemonbeat  
In recent years, the internet of things (IOT) paradigm expanded into manifold applications such as wireless sensor networks, smart metering, and building automation. The involved IOT devices are typically equipped with a radio interface and based on low-complexity microcontrollers. The data that is processed and transmitted between devices and gateways is often sensitive with respect to security concerns. In metering applications for instance, data confidentiality is of utmost importance, whereas in control applications, integrity and authenticity of control commands must be guaranteed. However, with the high growth rate of devices and the mostly radio-based connectivity of devices the risk of security issues and attack scenarios has increased. Long range radios facilitate attacks where an attacker can target large numbers of devices. Implementing state-of-the-art security mechanisms is therefore crucial to ensure that security goals are met. Especially for low-cost systems that are designed for life cycles of more than a decade and for which in-field software updates are not feasible, the system design should be as future proof as possible. This is a very challenging task, since future development of security concepts, attack scenarios and newly discovered systematic weaknesses can hardly be foreseen. The development of quantum computer-based attacks on current state-of-the-art algorithms poses another thread that is currently hard to predict. Thus, a security design has to be based on current state-of-the art technologies and reasonable, conservative assumptions about future developments. On the other hand, the deployed constrained devices have restrictions regarding limited processing power, memory size, power consumption for battery driven applications and packet sizes for wireless networks. Therefore, the choice of security algorithms is a compromise between the level of security and practicability for constrained devices. This paper provides an overview of embedded security with focus on IOT applications. Typical security goals are introduced and an overview of current state-of-the-art security algorithms for encryption, key exchange, and signing is given as they are used in current IOT applications. It is analyzed to which extent these approaches are supported by hardware accelerators of currently available embedded platforms and if corresponding security libraries can be deployed in software at comparable processing time and power consumption. Recommendations are given for an exemplary application of a battery driven metering device with a target life cycle of 10+ years. A battery life cycle analysis concludes the feasibility of state-of-the-art security in constrained devices.
16:30 - 17:00
Leveraging Secure Device Management for In-Field Upgrades and Hardware Services Joe Tillison, Silicon Labs  
New IoT product functionality and features can often be enabled with recent advancements in MCU and SoC device security and device management capabilities. In this session, we will begin with a brief overview of security features that are used to support such secure embedded systems. We will explore several methods of enabling in-field updates using these features and the benefits and drawbacks of each. We will then look at the generic form of a device management system (DMS) how it operates, and how the basic IoT capabilities can be extended and managed through use of a DMS. For many years, software products have had the luxury of driving revenue in the form of post-purchase add-ons, product upgrades and various forms of micro-transactions. Embedded hardware, on the other hand, has lacked this style of continuing revenue and service life extension. In many cases, this is simply due to the restrictions of hardware. You cannot add a switch or lengthen a cable though a firmware update, and in many instances, you cannot add hardware to support future advanced features while maintaining an acceptable cost of goods for the low-cost version of the product. However, it is becoming increasingly common to find scenarios where in-field upgrades (and updates) of hardware are desirable. For example, the difference between a low-cost smart LED bulb that only supports on/off and a more advanced one that supports dimming may only be a matter of software. In another example, if including a 2.4 GHz Bluetooth Low Energy or Zigbee enabled MCU in a weight scale may not noticeably impact the bill of materials or cost of production, then the manufacturer could enable users to purchase an upgrade that turns their dumb scale into a smart IoT connected device. Finally, manufacturers of connected devices may wish to provide security and bug-fix updates for free but charge for the addition of new protocols or significant upgrades in performance. These capabilities and more can often be enabled through in-field updates and device management systems.
17:00 - 17:30
How to Hack a Smart City and What We Need from Cybersecurity for the Future of Connected Cities Yoni Kahana, NanoLock Security; Emmanuel Miconnet, Thales  
Connectivity is a wave of the future for cities, but unsecured connectivity is a catastrophe waiting to happen. Now, for the first time in history, billions of devices are connected to the most critical infrastructures in our society: out on the streets of cities worldwide. All of these connected devices such as cameras, traffic lights, sensors, and meters are left out in the open, exposed and vulnerable to attack at every step in their lifecycle. Motivated by financial and state reasons or the desire to inflict terror, there will be countless hackers looking to bring down our new sophisticated smart cities. The industry needs a new security solution for IoT device protection from point of inception, to installation and ongoing management that is scalable over time as the smart city itself grows. There is a powerful need in the market to deliver protection and management embedded into the flash, creating a secure channel between the cloud and the flash memory in the edge device, making it possible to safeguard the firmware in the event of a physical or network breach and to send secure updates between the cloud and the flash memory. It is also unique because it protects the device for its lifetime from production and supply chain to operational mode to end-of-life via firmware updates, significantly reducing the risk of attack from a device that was compromised early in the lifecycle. For a smart city implementation utilizing many devices, sensors and cameras from many manufacturers, safeguarding those devices from the onset is critical. NanoLock’s powerful defense for connected edge devices is currently utilized by leading smart city vendor, Thales who has developed, a Proof-of-Concept architecture for holistically securing IoT devices with controlling and with no performance hit with NanoLock. Also, 80 percent of the flash memory vendor market currently employs the NanoLock solution to protect its flash memory housed in IoT devices on the network. For example, a smart city infrastructure committee in charge of installing new security cameras could have Thales’s solution installed in the cameras right on the production line. The cameras are shipped, connected to the network and network integrity is checked by the operational control center, and because the solution is installed at the point of inception, the device is not subject to attacks traveling to its destination, during installation and setup, or implementation. NanoLock’s monitoring platform will also continue to provide secure updates through the IoT device’s lifecycle, reducing cyber-attack related downtime. NanoLock and Thales will present together on the new proof-of-concept solution for the smart city and provide a live demonstration a cyber-attack on a smart camera – and how NanoLock prevents it versus a traditionally secured device (secured via software in the CPU of the devices) in the context of a smart city attack.
15:30 - 17:30
Topic 10 Mioty
15:30 - 16:00
An Open, End-to-End Wireless Connectivity Platform for Massive Scale Industrial IoT Networks Wolfgang Thieme, BehrTech  
Delivering distinct range, power and cost advantages, Low Power Wide Area Networks (LPWAN) are among the key drivers of the Internet of Things (IoT). Nevertheless, there are several challenges associated with existing solutions that limit their long-term viability. From a technical perspective, traditional Ultra Narrow Band and Spread Spectrum LPWAN technologies are highly susceptible to co-channel interference in the license-free spectrum. Many solutions also lack a robust security mechanism and have limited support for fast-moving devices. From an operational perspective, legacy LPWANs are often tied to a specific hardware vendor or a third-party managed network. This raises significant issues of vendor lock-in, data privacy and increased network costs. Developed to tackle these challenges, MYTHINGS is the first hardware agnostic, integrable and interoperable wireless software platform for large-scale Industrial IoT (IIoT) networks. Built by the Canadian/German company BehrTech, there are two major technical aspects that make MYTHINGS a versatile next-gen LPWAN solution. First, it incorporates Fraunhofer’s patented MIOTY (Telegram Splitting Ultra Narrowband technology - TS UNB), the only LPWAN protocol to comply with the ETSI standard TS 103 357. Introducing an innovative random channel access method wherein a radio packet is divided into multiple short radio bursts, MIOTY has been certified by ETSI for unprecedented interference resilience, scalability and ultra-low power consumption. Second, MYTHINGS adopts a fully software-driven approach, enabling users to flexibly deploy their own hardware and easily integrate the solution in their own IT infrastructure. As the IoT ecosystem evolves around diverse components working in concert with each other, the enhanced interoperability and integrability in MYTHINGS will reduce complexity, time to deployment and costs while fostering security and data privacy. This paper and presentation will compare existing LPWAN technologies as it relates to key criteria for successful IIoT deployments, as well as the technical underpinnings of the newly released MYTHINGS platform and where it fits in the market today.
16:00 - 16:30
The Hunt for the Ideal Production Environment Wolfgang Schlauch, BMW Group  
Many conveyor belts and robots in plants interact with humans in some way. Most of the problems that occur can either be attributed to a problem in the code of the machines or to some problem in humans handling. There are cases where there is no human interaction and the logs of the robot do not show any differences between good and bad cases. Finding the causes for production stop would be an asset to reduce production costs. Thus, we start to analyze basic environmental variables such as temperature, humidity, and pressure to investigate whether these influence parts of production systems. Investigations such as this can allow the reduction of production costs. The use of IoT devices is beneficial due to their low cost, easy deployment, and adaptability. The ease of deployment and the non-interference with production allows the installation of sensors in places that are hard to access or where standard devices cannot be placed. The use of the MIOTY protocol by Fraunhofer IIS allows also an efficient use of resources due to the range enhancement and the possibility to have thousands of devices communicating. After only a few months, correlations between the environmental data and problems in production can be observed. With further investigations throughout the year there is a high probability that conditions can be identified that are inhibiting the production process. Adding further environmental variables may be of use to identify other influences on production.
16:30 - 17:00
City-Wide Positioning in Mioty Networks Using Signal-Strength Fingerprinting Steffen Meyer, Fraunhofer IIS  
Low Power Wide Area Networks (LPWAN) like Sigfox, LoRa or Mioty are getting high attention in the Internet of Things (IoT) context. However, precise and cheap Positioning in LPWAN is still an open topic. While GPS is a solution for many global positioning problems, it lacks indoor availability and requires additional hardware. In addition, energy consumption is too high for many LPWAN applications. In local wireless networks like WiFi or Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE), Signal Strength based Positioning is quite common. Often a Positioning Accuracy down to 1-2 meters is achieved by using the Signal Strength of the wireless network. Received Signal Strength (RSS) Fingerprinting is a common positioning algorithm that can benefit from the weak and reflected signals. Using RSS Fingerprinting on LPWAN Signals has the opportunity to create a cheap and energy aware positioning solution. To prove the validity of this concept, we use Mioty Signal Strength recordings of an extensive real-world city setup and feed it into an RSS Fingerprinting Solution for WiFi/BLE. Then we adapt the parameters to the characteristics of the LPWAN scenario. We show the concept, strength and weaknesses of the approach, achieved accuracy from real-world field tests and the effects of city scenario to a signal strength based positioning algorithm.
17:00 - 17:30
Self-Powered Wide-Area Network by an Unique Combination of Mioty with Energy Harvesting Dr. Peter Spies, Fraunhofer IIS  
Low-power wide-area networks (LPWANs) are a key technology in building up the Internet of things. LPWANs are introduced in a rising number of application areas like condition monitoring, building automation or transport and logistics. A major hurdle during the installation and operation of LPWANs is the power supply, which is typically covered by small batteries: These batteries have to be recharged or replaced depending on performance like duty-cycle, data rate, coverage and applied sensors. The MIOTY technology from Fraunhofer IIS stands for a LPWAN protocol based on the ETSI standard TS103357 with minimum power consumption and is thus well suited to extend the operation time of a single battery. Extending operation times even further can be achieved by the energy harvesting. This technology is using ambient energy like light, heat or motion to generate electricity and power small electric applications like sensors, microcontrollers or wireless transceivers. Fraunhofer IIS is working on highly efficient power management topologies and circuits, which can use very small voltages or currents from energy harvesting transducers for powering electronic applications. By the unique combination of energy harvesting and efficient energy management circuits with the MIOTY technology, completely self-powered and maintenance-free wireless sensors become possible. Small thermal gradients or vibrations and even indoor light are sufficient to power the MIOTY communication without any battery and transmit sensor data every couple of minutes. The presentation will review typical energy harvesting technologies and introduce energy management principles to use smallest amounts of ambient energy for powering electronic devices. It will also present the MIOTY protocol and its performance advantages with a special focus on power consumption and how the telegram splitting approach of MIOTY helps to enable energy harvesting operation. The presentation will furthermore present measurement results and performance data of a fully self-powered, maintenance-free MIOTY sensor node operated by light, thermal gradients or vibrations.
15:30 - 17:30
Tutorials 2 & 3
15:30 - 16:30
Embedded Antenna Design – Make or Buy Harald Naumann, tekmodul  
The wireless Internet of Things has a need for inexpensive wireless modules and antennas. An NB-IoT module will cost less than US$ 5 for a 1K unit order. A self-made NB-IoT antenna on a PCB could cost 0 US$. The 0 US$ is valid for 5G applications as well. With a well developed customised antenna, you will not just optimise your BOM for the antenna. 3 dB gain will help you to reduce energy consumption during TX by 50% easy. Best case your 10 US$ battery can be replaced to a 5 US$ battery. However, within 60 minutes, you will learn which is commercially and technically the best antenna option for you – Make it or buy it. You also will learn how to read an antenna data sheet and which embedded antenna (self-made PCB, chip or Flex-PCB-antenna) is the best option for your wireless IoT application. Moreover, the presentation will show success stories of IoT applications using embedded antennas. Agenda: Antenna basics Antenna parameters Working principle of a Vector Network Analyser Workflow and selection of embedded antennas Self-made NB-IoT and GSM antenna on band 2, 3, 8 and 20 out of the IoT / M2M Cookbook Self-made 5G antennas out of my new book about 5G development and private 5G networks Self-made LPWAN antenna (SIGFOX, LoRa, Weightless P) for EU and US Chip loop antenna design in for Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, ZigBee and GNSS (GPS, GLONASS, Galileo) Several antenna designs and review examples of cellular chip and self-made antennas Summary: Self Made Embedded Antenna Design versus Chip Antenna
16:30 - 17:30
Tools and Methods for Efficient Antenna Development Günther Klenner, K&K Prime Deutschland  
In 60 minutes you will learn how easy it is to use a PC-based Vector Network Analyser (VNA) made by MegiQ. Examples to be presented at the Antenna Tutorial Part 1 (Embedded antenna - make or buy) will include live measurements showing the detuning effect of the human body, plastic, and metal. With the USB based VNA, we show the return loss and resonance of the antenna and all effects in real-time in front of the participants A good return loss does not always mean good radiation. The antenna radiation pattern will be measured with our mobile radiation pattern test system (RMS). The RMS is so light that it can travel with us to any place we like. At the end of the session, we will hold a Q&A and discussion with the speakers.

WEKA-FACHMEDIEN-EVENTS

In close cooperation with recognized experts and the responsible editorial staff
of our well-known media brands we organize around 50 national and international B2B congresses, seminars and workshops each year for a defined specialist audience.

These cover topics such as embedded systems, automotive Ethernet, battery technology,
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Overview of all Current Events