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12. - 13. February 2020
WESTIN Grand Munich

Automotive Ethernet Congress

Complete Program

Day 1 - Wednesday, 12. February 2020

08:55 - 09:30
Keynote Session
08:55 - 09:00
Welcome
09:00 - 09:30
Keynote: IVN Design Options for Tomorrows Architectures Dieter Roedder, Robert Bosch
09:30 - 12:00
Session 1 Network & Architecture
09:30 - 10:00
Do we Really Need an All-IP Car? Thomas Liebetrau, Infineon Technologies; Dr. Tobias Islinger, Infineon Technologies  
We have seen and still see many different In-Vehicle-Networking (IVN) technologies introduced in E/E architectures for passenger vehicles. Only a few of them have been sustainable solutions for a longer time. What is the difference to dayflies? Are the sustainable ones better, or cheaper? In this presentation, we will provide a brief overview of current IVN technologies being in development including ones, which compete against Ethernet, like CAN-XL and SerDes. We will discuss how Ethernet technologies fit into needs of automotive E/E architectures, today and tomorrow. How the game change with the transition towards domain based and zone based architectures? It is a common understanding that the evolution towards automated driving functions and connected cars has driven and still drives the spread of Ethernet in cars. No doubt, 100M and 1G technology will grow into automotive networks in the upcoming years. It is a success story. However, what about the low-end extension 10BASE-T1S, and how does it compete against the counter fight from the CAN community, called CAN-XL? What about the need for technologies beyond 1G, which are currently in standardization at IEEE, too. As a side topic, E/E architectures not only influence IVN technologies, but also the evolution of microcontrollers (MCUs). Microprocessors (MPUs) and System-on-chip solutions (SOCs) from consumer and industrial solutions push into automotive applications, which is simply caused by the enormous rise of computational power in parallel to the increase of interaction of electronic boxes and functions. Will MPUs replace MCUs at a certain point of time completely? Do we need tailored automotive devices, or is it necessary to deal with devices from consumer world in automotive applications? Infineon Technologies as a semiconductor vendor cannot only examine those technologies from a pure technical point of view. We need proven business cases to ensure that investments in new technologies will pay off after a reasonable period. Do the initial use cases of 10BASE-T1S and CAN-XL provide this already? In this presentation, we do not promise answers to all questions above. This is simply not possible from a semiconductor vendor point of view. However, we would like to initiate a discussion what is required to make technological ideas successful.
10:00 - 10:30
Meshing of the Networks: The Impact of Merging In-Vehicle Communications Networks to Support the Future Need for Adaptive Applications Mike Potts, Molex  
In planning for tomorrows Software Defined Vehicle (SDV) communication vehicular network architecture, there is a need to develop a system-level design approach that will allow for the merging of current vehicle functional requirements with new adaptive application demands. Application demands that will stress the in-vehicle communications network with increased data traffic requiring smaller more precise deterministic signaling and near zero end-to-end latency expectations. These design and implementation challenges are primarily spurred on by: 1) Automotive industry and consumer demand for the safety benefits that Advanced Driving-Assistance Systems (ADAS) and Automated Driving Systems (ADS) will potential enable, 2) the emergence of vehicular 5G+ and short-range wireless for connected-vehicle-to-everything (V2X) and remote OEM vehicle diagnostics and application service access, 3) the cost saving proposition of off-vehicle Backoffice Cloud computing, and 4) providing on-demand customer access and OEM corrective vehicle operational application access centered around a system-level Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) approach. This presentation examines how to support these demands by: 1) recognizing the problems for the network to support applications with accumulated congestion control issues when meshing larger event based “big data” with periodic vehicle operational communications requirements on existing in-vehicle infrastructures; and 2) Providing a three-pronged approach to support a SDV by optimizing the use of in-vehicle Ethernet based communications networks, enabling higher speed connections and more available bandwidth when required, and using standards based IEEE Time-Sensitive Network (TSN) tools to help provide quality of service based applications with accurate deterministic network information to manage meet end-to-end delay communication requirements.
10:30 - 11:00
COFFEE BREAK AND NETWORKING IN THE EXHIBITION
11:00 - 11:30
Early-stage Bottleneck Identification and Removal in TSN Networks Prof. Nicolas Navet, University of Luxembourg; Dr. Hoai Hoang Bengtsson, Volvo  
A main issue in the design of automotive networks is that important design choices pertaining to the topology and the technologies (i.e., protocols, data rate, hardware) have to be made at a time when the communication needs are not entirely known. The problem becomes more important for next-generation cars, as in-vehicle communication requirements will evolve and grow with new software functions and services being added during the lifetime of the vehicle. It is thus crucial to identify and remove bottlenecks in a candidate communication architecture so as to make the best possible use of the hardware resources and the technologies chosen. This will allow OEMs to offer the best possible service to the customers, generate revenues with new functions and services, and extend the lifetime of the platform. In this study we tackle the problem in the context of TSN backbone networks supporting mixed criticality streams (legacy traffic: audio, video, control, adas, fusion, data) and Some/IP services with different types of performance contraints (throughput and hard/soft deadlines). In the following, a TSN configuration refers to a TSN network which has been fully configured: network layout, data rates, streams allocated to the traffic classes, scheduling mechanism chosen for all traffic classes, etc. Our approach consists of three steps which can be automated by algorithms: 1. Quantify the "capacity" of a candidate TSN configuration in terms of the number of streams and services of the different types it can schedule, 2. Identify bottleneck resources in the TSN network, which can be links (too low date rates) and switches (switching delay, available memory, sub-optimal TAS schedule, etc), 3. Propose incremental improvements (e.g. duplicate a link, increase memory) and rank them in terms of how much they improve the capacity of the network. In our experience on a realistic centralized SOA architecture a single underdimensioned 100Mbit/s link can diminish the capacity of the TSN configuration in terms of number of services that the E/E architecture can host by 40%! We introduce the concepts of "bottleneck constraints", the most limiting constraints (e.g. a 10Mbit/s throughput constraint for software update) for the network and show to identify them. We then discuss what a bottleneck resource is, and show that the load of a resource is insufficient to identify bottlenecks. We propose new metrics based the contribution of a resource to the violation of the performance constraints. Throughout the presentation, the key concepts and steps of the approach are examplified on a realistic next-generation high-performance centralized architecture. This architecture is used to illustrate how the approach advocated allows to improve early-stage design choices and contribute to the design of more future-proof TSN networks. The aim of this presentation is also to raise discussions among the participants about the future of tool-assisted design.
11:30 - 12:00
Virtualizing Network Functions of the In-Vehicle Network Dr. Christian Herber, NXP Semiconductors; Manfred Kunz, NXP Semiconductors  
Modern in-vehicle networks employ advanced network functions for the purpose of e.g. routing, firewalling, and Intrusion Detection/Prevention Systems (IDS/IPS). These are resource hungry applications which require high bandwidth real-time processing of data. In traditional enterprise networks, each such network function is implemented as a dedicated hardware component, which would be the same as a separate ECU in in-vehicle networks. Due to the cost and weight constraints in vehicles, this approach isn’t feasible and an integrated solution is required. In enterprise networking and data centers, Network Function Virtualization (NFV) has been successfully used since a couple of years to create logically centralized network functions, which are running on standard x86 servers instead of dedicated and specialized hardware. This allows for high flexibility, as single network functions can easily be added, upgraded, or even removed simply through software updates and resource allocation. NFV is directly related to Software Defined Networking (SDN). SDN has been heavily discussed and investigated as the next generation of network control in automotive. As NFV centralizes network functions in a logical entity, SDN does the same with the control plane of the network. Access to the control plane is essential for a flexible NFV solution, e.g. to direct certain flows within the network to the physical network node which implements a routing function. While SDN is not a hard requirement for NFV, it ensures HW independence across the network. In this presentation, we will introduce the fundamentals of NFV and discuss how this approach can be applied to solve issues of in-vehicle networks. We will also draw an evolutionary path from today’s networks towards one that fully embraces NFV and SDN, highlighting what the intermediate steps are and what open items need to be addressed. It is demonstrated how an NFV approach can be used to achieve ideal network function performance by combining the best-fit capabilities of HW throughout the vehicle and potentially extending to the cloud. At the same time, the approach maintains independence from specific HW through standardized interfaces and configuration models. Finally, it results in a SW infrastructure that is both easier to manage, upgrade, and scale than non-virtualized solutions.
12:00 - 14:00
Session 2 Layers 3, 4
12:00 - 12:30
TCP/IP and Other Higher-Layer Protocols via CAN Holger Zeltwanger, CAN in Automation  
In the future, Ethernet-based backbone networks will also connect sub-layered networks using another data link layer technology. For those using one of the CAN data link layer approaches, a standardized mapping of TCP/IP is required. The paper will discuss the different existing options and will introduce new options. The combination of TCP/IP and CAN lower layers provides cost-effective solutions for all those sub-networks, which need bit-rates up to 10 Mbit/s. Running TCP/IP on CAN data link layers (Classical CAN, CAN FD, CAN XL) and using the Autosar multi-PDU concept provides new opportunities for the automotive system designer. The paper will discuss the physical layer and data link layer limitations as well as the higher-layer functions allowing a heterogenous multi-PDU concept. This enables transmission of real-time data, diagnostics, and other information. In particular in commercial vehicles, this approach is very suitable for the migration from legacy network standards to Ethernet-based system solutions.
12:30 - 14:00
LUNCH BREAK AND NETWORKING IN THE EXHIBITION
14:00 - 16:00
Session 3 Security & Safety
14:00 - 14:30
Automotive Ethernet Fuzzing - Challenges and Best Practices Ibrahim Memis, Robert Bosch  
With the introduction of automotive ethernet, security threats have become more and more serious and present. Therefore, it is crucial to identify security flaws during the development of products. This is can be done by security testing. Various security testing methodologies exist, which especially come from the area of traditional IT systems. One of them is called (protocol) fuzzing. In this methodology, (partly) random data is being provided as input to a system or a function and the behavior of the system/device under test is being monitored. Since automotive systems have their peculiarities compared to the traditional IT Systems, fuzzing cannot be mapped directly to the automotive domain. Fuzzing in general is aimed to be fully automated. This is often not possible for ECUs due to the necessity of restbus simulations. In order to fully automate a fuzz test the device under test has to be constantly checked whether it is functioning as planned or not. This is challenging because a lot of ECUs don’t support check methods like pinging. If an error occurred an automatic restart mechanism for the device under test is needed which is challenging too. Furthermore efficient and deep fuzzing of stateful protocols like TCP or SOME/IP is challenging because the fuzzer needs to be “intelligent”. In this presentation a short introduction to fuzzing and its importance will be given. Afterwards, challenges of automotive Ethernet fuzzing will be outlined and best practices will be presented. At the end, a new approach to intelligent fuzzing will be introduced.
14:30 - 15:00
Ethernet Security, the Protocols and its Challenges Harald Zweck, Infineon Technologies; Dr. Karsten Schmidt, Audi  
Ethernet Security, the Protocols and its Challenges Presentation by Dr Karsten Schmidt, AUDI AG, and Harald Zweck, Infineon Technologies Ethernet becomes an increasing important technology for communication in cars, for the In-Vehicle-Networks (IVN). The success is based on several properties of Ethernet: • many speed levels available • high degree of standardization • well developped ecosystem • solutions for security Especially the later became a focus of the automotive industry during the last years. Communication in Ethernet based networks need protection due to several reasons. All technical details of the Ethernet technology are disclosed as standards, which are defined and hosted e.g. by IEEE, and the related information is available to everybody. The operation flow of active network elements, e.g. of software stacks which build messages to be sent and disassemble received messages, is well known and can therefore be influenced easily. Furthermore, network elements can execute commands sent by remote requestors. The misuse of the functionality has to be avoided. Finally yet importantly, confidentiality to protect the content of the messages has to be assured. Today IT systems implement measures to protect networks and provide security. For Ethernet there are several security technologies available, 3 of the major security technologies will be presented: MACSec, IPSec, D/TLS. The presentation gives a short introduction into these technologies, into their structure and operation. By showing different use cases, the typical purpose of each technology is illustrated, and the impact on implementation. Finally, pros and cons are discussed. Typical examples for secured communication for in-vehicle network are: - ensure the authenticity of sensor-signals - ensure the authenticity of internal communications between different ECUs - encrypt sensitive information (e.g. personal information) Secure communication in automotive applications requires special implementations. Many applications communicate in hard real time. Therefore, also the operation of security units must support real time constraints. This is a significant difference to IT applications. The presentation will show at an abstract level HW implementation examples, discuss pros and cons and compare roughly processing performance. Implementation of standards impact the performance of the execution of the security protocol. The above-mentioned protocols contain many versions or sub versions, which are specialized for different use cases. Considering all versions forces manufacturer to provide complex solutions, which in turn has an impact on performance and cost. The presentation will make some proposals for reducing the protocol options and make implementations faster and more cost efficient.
15:00 - 15:30
Experience and Lessons Learned from Firewall and Intrusion Detection System Development for Automotive Ethernet Siddharth Shukla, eScrypt; Ramona Jung, ESCRYPT  
With the development of advanced vehicle functions like advanced driver assist systems and connectivity which allows continuous innovation and business even after sale, the amount of data within the vehicle has increased tremendously and therefore the use of Ethernet within cars has increased faster than expected. A recent report mentioned that the automotive Ethernet market would be worth 4.4 Billion USD by 2024. New E/E architectures for the automotive network are moving towards a domain controlled architecture. Different domains of the vehicle are connected to each other by using a central Ethernet switch in the gateway, or have a similar architecture. Continuous addition of consumer features during vehicle’s lifetime brings in many challenges along with the opportunities it offers. Resultantly, complexity in terms of data handling and security increases. With increasing risk of remote attacks performed on cars because of increased connectivity, the Defense-In-Depth approach has by now become a well-known industry standard to mitigate potential attacker from taking control of vehicular functions. We now need to apply a similar Defense-In-Depth approach to future Ethernet based E/E architecture in order to ensure at least similar level on security on Ethernet – if not more – than secure CAN network. Firewall and Intrusion Detection System (IDS) are key components to ensure security in vehicle E/E architecture. Firewall and IDS development on Ethernet switch brings in a lot of benefits along with the challenges it gives. The talk will focus on lessons learned from Firewall and IDS implementation for Automotive Ethernet on Ethernet switches and microcontrollers. We will present an insight on challenges like: 1. What are the difference between Firewall and IDS and how can a clear boundary be defined? 2. How to handle latency and security requirements together? 3. How to implement Deep Packet Inspection for Diagnostic over IP (DoIP) and SOME/IP in Firewall and IDS? 4. Which challenges arise w.r.t. message frequency detection? 5. How to deal with encrypted traffic and what is possible there? 6. What are the lessons learned on doing secure switch configuration? 7. Is it possible to securely do dynamic policy reconfiguration during runtime? If yes, then how to handle it? 8. How to handle complexity w.r.t. linking vehicle states with firewall rules?
15:30 - 16:00
COFFEE BREAK AND NETWORKING IN THE EXHIBITION

Parallel Sessions

16:00 - 18:00
Workshop 1 Automotive Ethernet and Service-Oriented E/E Architectures
16:00 - 18:00
Workshop 1: Automotive Ethernet and Service-Oriented E/E Architectures Daniel Gebauer, Vector Informatik; Varas Marcelino, Vector Informatik  
Automotive Ethernet is changing the paradigm for designing communication architectures: Instead of a signal-oriented communication, ECUs offer services via a defined protocol to all other participants in the network. The lecture illustrates what is meant by the term "service", what distinguishes service-oriented architectures and what consequences they have for the development of distributed systems. Design workflows for Ethernet communication in AUTOSAR Classic, AUTOSAR Adaptive and hybrid systems are presented and explained using Vector's model-based E/E development environment PREEvision as an example: PREEvision supports the AUTOSAR compliant design of automotive Ethernet networks from scratch. Starting with the definition of the Service landscape including Service Dependencies and Roles (Service-Provider / -Consumer) and the more detailed modeling of the Service Interface and its content (SOA). Therefore, PREEvision offers helpful Unified Modeling Language (UML) and Systems Modeling Language (SysML) graphical diagram editors. The tool supports the common transport protocols like SOME/IP and helps to specify the communication infrastructure and the Ethernet communication. Now you can set up a hardware topology with Ethernet clusters structured by VLANs and continue with details like Sockets, IP Addresses and Transport Protocols like TCP and UDP. Other common bus technologies such as CAN (FD), LIN and Flexray are supported too. PREEvision's functionality for automotive Ethernet networks supports both the AUTOSAR Classic platform with its signal-based approach as well as the service-oriented Adaptive AUTOSAR platform. PREEvision offers a model-based development approach supporting many teams in a collaborative environment. The workflow mentioned above is assisted by a step-by-step UI interfaces and dedicated checks for model consistency. For a good integration in existing processes PREEvision supports reliable Import- and Export-Interfaces to all common exchange formats. For the AUTOSAR Use-Case there are System- and ECU-Extracts (Classic) and for Adaptive the common formats like Machine- and Application-Manifest are available.
16:00 - 18:00
Workshop 2 From the Cloud to the Car - Use Cases
16:00 - 18:00
Workshop 2: From the Cloud to the Car - Use Cases Dr. Rajeev Roy, NXP Semiconductors; Michael Johnston, NXP Semiconductors  
As cars become an integral part of an extended network from the backend station of an OEM to the vehicle itself, Ethernet plays an integral role in facilitating and ensuring the operation of any connectivity with the cloud. The term cloud connectivity itself is a generic term where information can be accessed anywhere beyond the physical boundaries of the vehicle itself- so in principle could be from a roadside infrastructure to a remote cross continental location. Different use cases- such as Over The Air (OTA) updates, In car/In cloud Data Analytics and Software Defined Networking (SDN) will be discussed in detail and examined from the data connectivity and security perspectives across the whole network chain. We will present an network overview of the different end to end Ethernet connectivity scenarios across different connectivity domains (e.g. Mobile, WAN and IVN). The physical connectivity will be discussed to illustrate the various technologies which are required to make end-to-end Ethernet connectivity possible (e.g. Wireline- OTN, MPLS-TP, Automotive Ethernet etc. and Wireless technologies- e.g. cellular 3G/4G, 5G). As an endpoint of the data reception or as a data originator the car also has its own network- the so called In Vehicle Network (IVN) - we also examine the different sort of Electronic Control Unit (ECU) (e.g. Gateway, Telematics box)functionality and architectures and detail out how the information reaches where it is intended. Increasing connectivity opens up a wider range of attack possibilities and security remains a primary concern which needs to be addressed in such scenarios.In this context we will discuss about the security requirements (e.g. TLS, IPSec, MACSec etc.) and the role Ethernet plays in creating a secure remote communication link.
16:00 - 18:00
Workshop 3 Automotive Ethernet Debugging, Compliance Testing and Switch Latency Measurements
16:00 - 18:00
Workshop 3: Automotive Ethernet Debugging, Compliance Testing and Switch Latency Measurements Dr. Ernst Flemming, Rohde&Schwarz  
We run a physical layer compliance test for TC8 and TC9 and discuss challenges during this compliance test. We run this for 100BASE-T1, 1000BASE-T1 and 10BASE-T1S. Users can bring both, ECU and Cable to run the tests on different DUTs. This is a workshop with lots of hands on and vendor neutral to show the challenges and possible solutions for compliance test.
16:00 - 18:00
Workshop 4 Automotive Ethernet Layer 1 to Layer 7 Test Automation
16:00 - 18:00
Workshop 4: Automotive Ethernet Layer 1 to Layer 7 Test Automation Darshan Mehta, Tektronix  
We will submit within 2-3 days
16:00 - 18:00
Workshop 5 Security for Ethernet EE-Architecture
16:00 - 18:00
Workshop 5: Security for Ethernet EE-Architecture Siddharth Shukla, eScrypt
16:00 - 18:00
Workshop 6 Automotive Ethernet Switch Training
16:00 - 18:00
Workshop 6: Automotive Ethernet Switch Training John Simon, Intrepid
18:00 - 20:00
Get-together
18:00 - 20:00
GET-TOGETHER AND NETWORKING IN THE EXHIBITION

Day 2 - Thursday, 13. February 2020

09:00 - 09:30
Keynote Session
09:00 - 09:30
Keynote
09:30 - 11:00
Session 4 Validation & Test
09:30 - 10:00
Ensuring Security of Data Communication in an IVN and Comparing the Choice of Encryption Techniques Avik Bhattacharya, Keysight Technologies  
Security of a connected car is one of the biggest concerns in the automotive world. With automotive Ethernet, the in-vehicular network is adopting a shared network design. Number of ECUs, sensors, and interconnects is growing inside a car and ECUs in different car domains will be interconnected with Ethernet backbones. Encryption is a well-established technique in the networking world for securing data communications in a shared network. There are different methods of encryption at different layers of an Ethernet stack. Though the techniques are widely used in traditional networking world, adoption of these in an automotive environment with time critical applications and new automotive physical layer is not a proven track. A proper adoption requires sophisticated validation methods in the network test cycle. This presentation will focus on the effectiveness of different encryption methods, e.g. IPSec or MacSec, in the car network and validation methodologies.
10:00 - 10:30
AVB/TSN Testing Strategy from Semiconductor up to ECU and System Level Jörg Angstenberger, Ruetz System Solutions  
AVB/TSN Testing Strategy from Semiconductor up to ECU and System Level RUETZ SYSTEM SOLUTIONS gained extensive experiences in system design, test and integration scenarios from the beginning of Automotive AVB and was heavily involved in task forces for AVB/TSN implementations in a near-series environment. This presentation introduces a consistent testing strategy for AVB/TSN from the semiconductor to the ECU and system level. From an automotive manufacturer's point of view, there is a strong demand for ensuring AVB/TSN functionality across the entire supply chain and at all levels of integration. It will be demonstrated how requirements and profiles from automotive manufacturers, OPEN ALLIANCE specifications, and related IEEE AVB/TSN standards are taken into account to make meaningful test scenarios for components and systems. For components, these test scenarios not only consider a standard-compliant implementation, but also the proper parameterization of the device according to the system specification as well as the assessment of robustness, performance and long-term behavior. At system level, the focus of validation activity is on the interaction of the individual components. Here it is expedient to monitor the TSN/AVB traffic in real time and record corresponding fault pattern in case of parameter violations and abnormalities. The presentation results in a comprehensive recommendation on how to verify AVB/TSN implementations in automotive applications.
10:30 - 11:00
COFFEE BREAK AND NETWORKING IN THE EXHIBITION
11:00 - 14:00
Session 5 Layer 2
11:00 - 11:30
When GATE's Misbehave for IEEE 802.1Qbv Implementation Tanuman Bhaduri, Keysight Technologies  
IEEE 802.1Qbv provides scheduling across bridges for time critical application traffic. This ensures predictable and low latency end-to-end paths for industrial and in-vehicle applications that require precise communication. Accuracy is hugely important when implementing 802.1Qbv in production devices, metrics for accuracy measurement includes factors like measuring the phase jitter of opening and closing time of time gates queues. In case of a positive phase jitter where a gate fails to close within a stipulated duration of time, it can result in allowing unwanted bandwidth into the network. For an automotive network this can spell havoc in terms signal pdu’s not reaching their destination on time. The applications that typically run inside a car are time sensitive and this needs to be guaranteed by ensuring traffic shaping paradigms like Time Aware Shaper functions properly inside an automotive network. This presentation would focus on the automotive scenarios where time sensitive networking paradigms plays a major role. We would deep dive into Time Aware Shaper implementations and cases where it goes wrong and the its impact on an in vehicular network. This presentation will also cover how misalignment of time gated queues can be characterized in the validation phase itself and the unique testing challenges that comes along with it.
11:30 - 12:00
Achievable Accuracy of gPTP Synchronization over PCIe Thorsten Hoffleit, Renesas Electronics Europe  
Time synchronization is one of the most essential requirements for modern automotive network. This is required for synchronizing applications across network e.g. ADAS, autonomous driving etc. gPTP (IEEE 802.1AS) has emerged as choice of engineers for this purpose. gPTP-rev(No. TBD) specification also covers safety (redundancy) and security (secure time) aspects which makes gPTP favorite for time synchronization. Today’s SoC hosts many virtual machines and cores running on one SoC which are mimicking functionality of many ECUs in traditional system. Connecting SoC via PCIe to a multi-gig NIC/Ethernet Switch is very common and flexible choice. PCIe technologies like SRIOV to share IO devices are also key enabler for such architectures. In addition to that, SOC has its own Ethernet interface which needs to be synchronized to the same gPTP time. Problem: Virtual machine(s) which are running on SoC need to be precisely time synchronized to rest of the network (ECUs, sensors, actuators etc) for correct operation of the automotive systems. gPTP achieves sub-microsecond accuracy by accurate time stamping at hardware level. Ethernet products (Switches and with Endpoints) have come with such hardware features which make gPTP usage possible in Ethernet network. With PCIe as connection between NIC/Switch and SoC, this kind of accurate synchronization needs careful theoretical and practical evaluation. Current PCIe implementations (<v4.0) does not have support for time synchronization. PCIe 4.0 supports Precision time measurement (PTM). How accurately one can synchronize gPTP time over PCIe is matter of importance. Further gPTP time inside SOC needs to be synchronized with time from external switch and made available to local endpoints. We have looked at possibility of synchronization of gPTP network over PCIe. Following cases were investigated 1. gPTP synchronization between independent local endpoints. Synchronization is to be done in software and accuracy to be measured 2. gPTP synchronization over PCI without PTM. Synchronization is to be done in software and accuracy to be measured 3. gPTP synchronization over PCI with PTM like extension. Check how it works and what’s accuracy achieved We would like to present our accuracy results with pre-requisites, practical problems faced, solutions, limitations, software load and overall conclusion on this problem.
12:00 - 12:30
Choosing the Right TSN Tool(s) to Meet a Network’s Bounded Latency Requirement Don Pannell, NXP Semiconductors  
The Time Sensitive Networking (TSN) standards do a great job of explaining “what” the standard is. But they are generally lacking in the areas of telling the reader “why” a given standard was created (i.e., what problem(s) the standard solves) nor do they tell “how” the standards were envisioned to be used. With Audio Video Bridging (AVB), the AVB Profile (IEEE 802.1BA) answered the “how” question. This was an easy task in this case, since AVB is a plug-and-play use case that has only one way to do things (for example, there is only one stream shaper that can be used – IEEE 802.1Qav). Since AVB’s completion, TSN has expanded to many more use cases, with multiple seemingly similar tools, targeted at “Engineered” networks. It is now up to these Engineers to figure out what TSN tool(s) they need to solve their network challenges. To do that, they need to understand what problems the standard solves (the “why”), and when each standard should be applied (the “how”). This is especially challenging when needing to bound the maximum latency of all the flows in a network, as there are many TSN tools to choose from. This presentation will focus on the TSN standards that affect the bounded latency of flows through the network. It will briefly list the unique problems each of these TSN standard solves and the relative ‘costs’ of using each tool (in terms of silicon complexity, of configuration (Engineering) complexity, and in network efficiency). Based on these numbers, a per-hop metric will be proposed to determine which tool should be used and when. This hierarchy, or priority order of tool usage, makes the job of “Engineering” the network so much easier due to the step-by-step process that will be shown. After this presentation the audience will not only have a clear understanding the “whys” and the “hows” for each of the TSN standards that affect bounded latency, but they will also know which tool to start with and what tool(s) to select next to solve their network latency challenges.
12:30 - 14:00
LUNCH BREAK AND NETWORKING IN THE EXHIBITION
14:00 - 16:45
Session 6 PHY
14:00 - 14:30
Automotive Ethernet and SerDes Technologies - Friends or Foes? Stefan Brunner, Automotive SerDes Alliance (ASA); Claude Gauthier, Automotive SerDes Alliance (ASA)  
In today's E/E Architectures, there are various communication scopes. One example for a scope is the connection of sensors and actuators to the processing ECU. A typical application here is the transmission of video data. Another example is the interconnection between high performance ECUs, often referred to as communication backbones. Automotive Ethernet was originally introduced as a technology to address the need for higher data rates in the in-vehicle network. In its first series production use case, the Automotive Ethernet variant 100BASE-T1 (called OPEN Alliance BroadR-Reach at the time) was thus deployed to connect cameras to the surround-view ECU. Since its start of production in 2013, the need for higher data rates has continued to increase, often, but not only driven by the ever better resolution of video data. Ethernet is today the leading technology for backbone applications and also for the connection of sensors and actuators in use. However, especially for the communication of high speed video data also SerDes (sometimes also called “LVDS”, “pixellink”, “high speed video link”) technologies loom large. Are the two technologies thus competing, or do they complement each other? This presentation will provide answers to that question. For this it will look at all aspects of deployment: Application level, functional differences between a networking and a P2P-technology, at implementation differences between symmetrical and asymmetrical transmission technologies on chip level, and at the existing eco-systems. It will show that in most situations Automotive Ethernet and SerDes technologies complement each other, but that there can be a small overlap in which the two technology groups compete. This answer motivates the need to standardize also SerDes technologies and the presentation will briefly discuss current efforts to do so in the Automotive SerDes Association.
14:30 - 15:00
Optical Multi-Gigabit Ethernet – on the Verge of Standardization and Implementation Carlos Pardo, KDPOF Knowledge Development for POF  
With technological leaps such as electrical vehicles, automated driving, and V2X interconnection rushing through, carmakers and suppliers have to solve major challenges. Automotive applications, utilization and safety requirements are boosting the necessary network speed tremendously. Consequently, in-vehicle networks are on the brink of speeds from one to multiple Gigabits per second. Following the IEEE Std 802.3bv™ for Gigabit Ethernet over POF, which defines physical layer specifications and management parameters for automotive networking applications with POF, multi-gigabit Ethernet is the significant upcoming breakthrough for in-vehicle networks. The standardization effort for optical multi-gigabit is already in progress. The presentation will display the ongoing process and the standardization schedule. In addition, KDPOF will present the key advantages of the optical solution for specific applications using multi-gigabit speeds with in-vehicle connectivity. Relevant use cases from different carmakers in Europe and US will specify the comprehensive features and benefits of the optical network technology. Use cases include the interconnectivity of telematics control modules, redundant and safe backbones for autonomous driving architectures and advance driving assistant system sensors. Key leading optoelectronic, connector, and wire harness vendors worldwide are prepared and already provide a well-supplied and competitive market with all the new components needed for multi-gigabit in the car: Physical Layer (PHY), Fiber Optic Transceiver (FOT), fibers, connectors, and light sources. A sample of the underlying technologies and its capability to meet the stringent requirements of the automotive industry will also be shown.
15:00 - 15:30
COFFEE BREAK AND NETWORKING IN THE EXHIBITION
15:30 - 16:00
The Need for Asymmetrical Data Transmission - An Evolutionary Step for Automotive Ethernet? Juergen Röder, Continental Automotive  
The Need for Asymmetrical Data Transmission An evolutionary step for Automotive Ethernet? The change of future mobility towards automated and electrified driving will not only affect the infrastructure and usage-behavior of vehicles, but also the internal electrical structure of vehicles. This structure often referred as E/E architecture describes the construction and networking of the vehicle's electrical/electronic components. With more than a hundred Electronic Control Unit’s (ECUs) within a premium vehicle increasing towards dimensions of complexity that become hard to manage. In addition, future scalability and expandability of the E/E architecture will be necessary for the whole lifetime of the vehicle. To deal with this new system requirements a clear trend towards a server-zone architecture is visible. First solutions are entering the market now. High-performance control devices - the servers – are the core of a server-zone architecture. The electrical structure is divided according to the geographical location of the components into zones. Various Sensor data is collected by the zone controllers, forwarded to the server for processing and received back by the zone controller as control data to be transmitted to the actuators. Within this given network structure, two different communication domains can be identified: • Server domain: mostly symmetrical data transmission (balanced uplink/downlink) • Zone Domain: mostly asymmetric data transmission (large uplink/less downlink) The communication of both domains can be implemented with Automotive Ethernet as well as alternative technologies Data streams generated or processed by sensors and actuators usually have a bidirectional but asymmetric characteristic. The fully balanced bidirectional data transmission capability of today’s available Automotive Ethernet PHY’s should be extended or new asymmetric Automotive Ethernet PHY’s should be introduced to take this fact into account. Carrying out an optimization of data transmission related resources (e.g. bandwidth, energy, ..) and providing cost-optimized solutions finally. The presentation identifies the requirements for future asymmetric Ethernet transceivers. Based on the server-zone architectures described above, their need will be justified, and advantages/ disadvantages will be compared. The need for worldwide standardization is mentioned. Alternative technologies are briefly touched.
16:00 - 16:30
10BASE-T1S: The Solution for Introducing Ethernet to Low-Speed Network Takashi Yasuda, JASPAR (Toyota, Nissan, Honda and Mazda)  
The in-vehicle network traffic is rapidly increasing due to the growth of data demands, and it is the driving force to introduce 100M and 1G high-speed ethernet to the automotive. Here, looking at the current in-vehicle network, it is the low-speed communication up to 10 M that occupies the majority. The vehicle and part manufacturers can benefit greatly in terms of functionality and development efficiency by diverting technology assets developed with high-speed ethernet to low-speed area. And now, what is required for the ethernet to extend the application to the area of low-speed is cost competitiveness. IEEE is developing 10BASE-T1S to respond these needs. The important features of 10BASE-T1S from the viewpoint of cost competitiveness are the multi-drop connection and the bandwidth utilization efficiency provided by PLCA. However, each causes trade-off problem. In the multi-drop, the problem exists between the physical scale of the topology and the signal quality. And for PLCA, the problem exists between bandwidth utilization rate and latency. Although these trade-offs are discussed individually, there have been no cases where they were analysed from an integrated perspective. In this presentation, we report design methods solving these 2 trade-offs and the verification results in realistic use cases to prove the cost competitiveness of 10BASE-T1S. The first is the use case definition. To make the solution convincing, use cases are defined based on the Japanese OEM's forecast. One example is ADAS sensor network. Since multiple sensors such as the radars and sonars are allocated at the outer edge of the vehicle, it is necessary to satisfy stringent requirements in terms of EMC and the number of nodes. Also, unlike an image sensor, the bandwidth is expected to be 10 M or less even in the future. In this way, the realistic corner cases are selected. Next is the design and verification of the multidrop. As the wires, UTP and J-UTP are applied to analyse the trade-off between cost and performance. As the connectors, general connectors are applied for the board and relay because they have a large impact on costs. And the harness has a daisy chain structure, its dimensions are determined based on the use case. Using these materials, we design the harness and ECU board assuming a harsh EMC that will be required in the future, and report the analysis results through EMC tests using prototypes. The last is the design and verification of PLCA. As a scheduling technique, a multislot for assigning a frame to a plurality of slots and a burst mode for assigning a plurality of frames to a slot are applied. Although not a PLCA configuration, the sensor sampling rate reduction and frame size limitation are applied to optimize the bandwidth utilization rate and latency. Using these techniques, we find a design method that maximizes the bandwidth utilization rate while meeting the latency requirements, and report the results of comparative analysis with CSMA.
16:30 - 16:45
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 Juliane Heger, WEKA FACHMEDIEN

Juliane Heger
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WEKA FACHMEDIEN

Phone: +49 89 25556 1155

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